thicket


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thick·et

 (thĭk′ĭt)
n.
1. A dense growth of shrubs or underbrush; a copse.
2. Something suggestive of a dense growth of plants, as in impenetrability or thickness: "the thicket of unreality which stands between us and the facts of life" (Daniel J. Boorstin).

[Old English thiccet, from thicce, thick; see thick.]

thicket

(ˈθɪkɪt)
n
(Botany) a dense growth of small trees, shrubs, and similar plants
[Old English thiccet; see thick]

thick•et

(ˈθɪk ɪt)

n.
a dense growth of shrubs, bushes, or small trees.
[before 1000; Old English thiccet (not recorded in Middle English) =thicce thick + -et n. suffix]

Thicket

 a clump of trees, 1440; a collection of tangled underbrush.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thicket - a dense growth of bushesthicket - a dense growth of bushes    
botany, flora, vegetation - all the plant life in a particular region or period; "Pleistocene vegetation"; "the flora of southern California"; "the botany of China"
brake - an area thickly overgrown usually with one kind of plant
canebrake - a dense growth of cane (especially giant cane)
spinney - a copse that shelters game
underbrush, undergrowth, underwood - the brush (small trees and bushes and ferns etc.) growing beneath taller trees in a wood or forest

thicket

noun wood, grove, woodland, brake, clump, covert, hurst (archaic), copse, coppice, spinney (Brit.) a bamboo thicket
Translations
أجَمَه، دَغْل، حَرَجَه صَغيرَه
houština
krat
arbustos apegadoshuerto densomatorral
sûrû
kjarr, òykkni
tankumynas
biezoknis
húština
fundalık

thicket

[ˈθɪkɪt] Nmatorral m

thicket

[ˈθɪkɪt] nfourré m

thicket

nDickicht nt

thicket

[ˈθɪkɪt] nboscaglia

thicket

(ˈθikit) noun
a group of trees or bushes growing closely together. He hid in a thicket.
References in classic literature ?
But there went a report through all the land of the beautiful sleeping Briar Rose (for so the king's daughter was called): so that, from time to time, several kings' sons came, and tried to break through the thicket into the palace.
They were in search of deer, when suddenly a huge grizzly bear emerged from a thicket about thirty yards distant, rearing himself upon his hind legs with a terrific growl, and displaying a hideous array of teeth and claws.
The birds twittered more and more loudly and busily in the thicket.
Saxon followed the faint path that led steeply down through the thicket.
The greater part of the Blackfeet were slain; the remnant took shelter in a close thicket of willows, where the horse could not enter; whence they plied their bows vigorously.
Then I came to a long thicket of these oaklike trees-- live, or evergreen, oaks, I heard afterwards they should be called--which grew low along the sand like brambles, the boughs curiously twisted, the foliage compact, like thatch.
And so thought I, also," cried Robin Hood, bursting out of the thicket and shouting with laughter till the tears ran down his cheeks.
Outside this door a spade was placed against the wall; I took it, and advanced towards the thicket.
But instead of observing the caution recommended by Abiram, they proceeded in a body, until they again came to a halt within a few yards of the matted cover of the thicket.
Thwackum was so intent on the discovery, that, the moment he found himself at liberty, he stept forward directly into the fern, without any great consideration of what might in the meantime befal his friend; but he had advanced a very few paces into the thicket, before Jones, having defeated Blifil, overtook the parson, and dragged him backward by the skirt of his coat.
When they reached the spot where the Indian stood, pointing into the thicket that fringed the military road; a narrow and blind path, which might, with some little inconvenience, receive one person at a time, became visible.
The distance I had come, or the intervening masses of thicket, deadened any sound that might be coming from the enclosure.