thicket

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thick·et

 (thĭk′ĭt)
n.
1. A dense growth of shrubs or underbrush; a copse.
2. Something suggestive of a dense growth of plants, as in impenetrability or thickness: "the thicket of unreality which stands between us and the facts of life" (Daniel J. Boorstin).

[Old English thiccet, from thicce, thick; see thick.]

thicket

(ˈθɪkɪt)
n
(Botany) a dense growth of small trees, shrubs, and similar plants
[Old English thiccet; see thick]

thick•et

(ˈθɪk ɪt)

n.
a dense growth of shrubs, bushes, or small trees.
[before 1000; Old English thiccet (not recorded in Middle English) =thicce thick + -et n. suffix]

Thicket

 a clump of trees, 1440; a collection of tangled underbrush.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thicket - a dense growth of bushesthicket - a dense growth of bushes    
botany, flora, vegetation - all the plant life in a particular region or period; "Pleistocene vegetation"; "the flora of southern California"; "the botany of China"
brake - an area thickly overgrown usually with one kind of plant
canebrake - a dense growth of cane (especially giant cane)
spinney - a copse that shelters game
underbrush, undergrowth, underwood - the brush (small trees and bushes and ferns etc.) growing beneath taller trees in a wood or forest

thicket

noun wood, grove, woodland, brake, clump, covert, hurst (archaic), copse, coppice, spinney (Brit.) a bamboo thicket
Translations
أجَمَه، دَغْل، حَرَجَه صَغيرَه
houština
krat
arbustos apegadoshuerto densomatorral
sûrû
kjarr, òykkni
tankumynas
biezoknis
húština
fundalık

thicket

[ˈθɪkɪt] Nmatorral m

thicket

[ˈθɪkɪt] nfourré m

thicket

nDickicht nt

thicket

[ˈθɪkɪt] nboscaglia

thicket

(ˈθikit) noun
a group of trees or bushes growing closely together. He hid in a thicket.
References in classic literature ?
At an early hour one day, he encamped in a narrow valley on the banks of a beautifully clear but rushy pool; surrounded by thickets bearing abundance of wild cherries, currants, and yellow and purple gooseberries.
On one side was a coral reef; on the other a low tongue of land, covered with mangrove thickets that grew out into the water.
Now as Little John stepped blithely along, thinking of nothing but of such things as the sweetness of the hawthorn buds that bedecked the hedgerows, or gazing upward at the lark, that, springing from the dewy grass, hung aloft on quivering wings in the yellow sunlight, pouring forth its song that fell like a falling star from the sky, his luck led him away from the highway, not far from the spot where Arthur a Bland was peeping this way and that through the leaves of the thickets. Hearing a rustling of the branches, Little John stopped and presently caught sight of the brown cowhide cap of the Tanner moving among the bushes
I turned away from the thickets, keeping to the more open ground, and endeavouring by sudden turns now and then to surprise something in the act of creeping upon me.
Regiments and brigades, broken and detached through their encounters with thickets, grew together again and lines were faced toward the pursuing bark of the enemy's infantry.
Our direct course towards it lay through a rather populous part of the bay; but desirous as we were of evading the natives and securing an unmolested retreat to the mountains, we determined, by taking a circuit through some extensive thickets, to avoid their vicinity altogether.
Below them, the roads, intersected by "nullahs," a sort of instantaneous torrent, were soon rendered impracticable, entangled as they were, besides, with thorny thickets and gigantic lianas, or creeping vines.
But there went a report through all the land of the beautiful sleeping Briar Rose (for so the king's daughter was called): so that, from time to time, several kings' sons came, and tried to break through the thicket into the palace.
The birds twittered more and more loudly and busily in the thicket. An owl hooted not far off, and Laska, starting, stepped cautiously a few steps forward, and putting her head on one side, began to listen intently.
Saxon followed the faint path that led steeply down through the thicket. Midway along, where a barbed wire fence was strung high across the mouth of the gulch and weighted down with big rocks, she caught her first glimpse of the tiny beach.
The greater part of the Blackfeet were slain; the remnant took shelter in a close thicket of willows, where the horse could not enter; whence they plied their bows vigorously.
Then I came to a long thicket of these oaklike trees-- live, or evergreen, oaks, I heard afterwards they should be called--which grew low along the sand like brambles, the boughs curiously twisted, the foliage compact, like thatch.