thief


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

thief

 (thēf)
n. pl. thieves (thēvz)
One who commits the act or crime of theft.

[Middle English, from Old English thēof.]

thief

(θiːf)
n, pl thieves (θiːvz)
1. a person who steals something from another
2. (Law) criminal law a person who commits theft
[Old English thēof; related to Old Frisian thiāf, Old Saxon thiof, Old High German diob, Old Norse thjōfr, Gothic thiufs]
ˈthievish adj
ˈthievishly adv
ˈthievishness n

thief

(θif)

n., pl. thieves.
a person who steals, esp. secretly.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English thēof, c. Old Frisian thiāf, Old Saxon thiof, Old High German thiob, Old Norse thjōfr, Gothic thiufs]
syn: thief, robber refer to one who steals. A thief takes the goods or property of another by stealth without the latter's knowledge: like a thief in the night. A robber trespasses upon the house, property, or person of another, and makes away with things of value, even at the cost of violence: An armed robber held up the store owner.

thief

  • jilt - A female accomplice to a thief.
  • furtive - Someone who is furtive literally "carries things away like a thief."
  • ferret - Its name comes from Latin furritus, "little thief"—alluding to the animal's affinity for stealing hens' eggs.
  • thief - Has the underlying meaning of "crouching, furtive person."

thief

robberburglar

Anyone that steals can be called a thief. A robber often uses violence or the threat of violence to steal things from places such as banks or shops.

They caught the armed robber who raided a supermarket.

A burglar breaks into houses or other buildings and steals things.

The average burglar spends just two minutes inside your house.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling itthief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it
bandit, brigand - an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a band
shoplifter, lifter, booster - a thief who steals goods that are in a store
burglar - a thief who enters a building with intent to steal
criminal, crook, felon, malefactor, outlaw - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
dacoit, dakoit - a member of an armed gang of robbers
defalcator, embezzler, peculator - someone who violates a trust by taking (money) for his own use
body snatcher, ghoul, graverobber - someone who takes bodies from graves and sells them for anatomical dissection
graverobber - someone who steals valuables from graves or crypts
holdup man, stickup man - an armed thief
larcener, larcenist - a person who commits larceny
cutpurse, pickpocket, dip - a thief who steals from the pockets or purses of others in public places
literary pirate, pirate, plagiariser, plagiarist, plagiarizer - someone who uses another person's words or ideas as if they were his own
despoiler, freebooter, looter, pillager, plunderer, raider, spoiler - someone who takes spoils or plunder (as in war)
robber - a thief who steals from someone by threatening violence
cattle thief, rustler - someone who steals livestock (especially cattle)
cracksman, safebreaker, safecracker - a thief who breaks open safes to steal valuable contents
snatcher - a thief who grabs and runs; "a purse snatcher"
pilferer, sneak thief, snitcher - a thief who steals without using violence

thief

noun robber, crook (informal), burglar, stealer, bandit, plunderer, mugger (informal), shoplifter, embezzler, pickpocket, pilferer, swindler, purloiner, housebreaker, footpad (archaic), cracksman (slang), larcenist The thieves snatched the camera.
Quotations
"Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to become their property that they may more perfectly respect it" [G.K. Chesterton The Man who was Thursday]
Proverbs
"Set a thief to catch a thief"

thief

noun
Translations
لِصلِصّ
zloděj-ka
tyv
varasvoro
lopovtat
tolvaj
òjófur
泥棒
도둑
zaglis
hoţ
tat
kradljivaclopovtat
tjuv
mwizi
ขโมย
kẻ trộm

thief

[θiːf] N (thieves (pl)) [θiːvz]ladrón/ona m/f
stop thief!¡al ladrón!
you have to set a thief to catch a thiefno hay como un ladrón para atrapar a otro
see also thick A7

thief

[ˈθiːf] [thieves] [ˈθiːvz] (pl) nvoleur/euse m/f
stop thief! → au voleur!

thief

n pl <thieves> → Dieb(in) m(f); to set a thief to catch a thief (prov) → einen vom Fach benutzen; to be as thick as thieves (Brit) → dicke Freunde sein (inf)

thief

[θiːf] n (thieves (pl)) [θiːvz]ladro/a
stop thief! → al ladro!

thief

(θiːv) plural thieves (θiːvs) noun
a person who steals. The thief got away with all my money.
thieve (θiːf) verb
to steal. He is always thieving my pencils.

thief

لِصّ zloděj tyv Dieb κλέφτης ladrón varas voleur lopov ladro 泥棒 도둑 dief tyv złodziej ladrão вор tjuv ขโมย hırsız kẻ trộm 小偷
References in classic literature ?
A SUCCESSFUL Man of Business, having occasion to write to a Thief, expressed a wish to see him and shake hands.
No," replied the Thief, "there are some things which I will not take - among them your hand.
If thou best a miller,'' answered Gurth, undauntedly, making his weapon play around his head with equal dexterity, ``thou art doubly a thief, and I, as a true man, bid thee defiance.
After a long and fruitless search, he made a vow that, if he could only discover the thief who had stolen the Calf, he would offer a lamb in sacrifice to Hermes, Pan, and the Guardian Deities of the forest.
What thief would find his way to the Stone-pits on such a night as this?
And now that all the false hopes had vanished, and the first shock of certainty was past, the idea of a thief began to present itself, and he entertained it eagerly, because a thief might be caught and made to restore the gold.
The life of her governess, as she calls her, who had run through, it seems, in a few years, all the eminent degrees of a gentlewoman, a whore, and a bawd; a midwife and a midwife-keeper, as they are called; a pawnbroker, a childtaker, a receiver of thieves, and of thieves' purchase, that is to say, of stolen goods; and in a word, herself a thief, a breeder up of thieves and the like, and yet at last a penitent.
that is to say, in the slang of honest folks,--a thief, a beggar, or a vagabond.
I am a vagabond, a thief, a sharper, a man of the knife, anything you please; and I am all that already, monsieur, King of Thunes, for I am a philosopher;
said the thief, frightened; 'I'm sure I heard someone speak.
They at once adopted the obvious conclusion to persons of ordinary capacity--the conclusion that Isabel was the thief.
Theft he could not abide, and plainly there was a thief in his house.