thieving


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thieve

 (thēv)
tr. & intr.v. thieved, thiev·ing, thieves
To take (something) by theft or commit theft.

[Perhaps from Old English thēofian, from thēof, thief.]

thieving

(ˈθiːvɪŋ)
adj
given to stealing other people's possessions
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thieving - the act of taking something from someone unlawfullythieving - the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International"
breach of trust with fraudulent intent - larceny after trust rather than after unlawful taking
felony - a serious crime (such as murder or arson)
embezzlement, misappropriation, peculation, misapplication, defalcation - the fraudulent appropriation of funds or property entrusted to your care but actually owned by someone else
pilferage - the act of stealing small amounts or small articles
shoplifting, shrinkage - the act of stealing goods that are on display in a store; "shrinkage is the retail trade's euphemism for shoplifting"
robbery - larceny by threat of violence
biopiracy - biological theft; illegal collection of indigenous plants by corporations who patent them for their own use
grand larceny, grand theft - larceny of property having a value greater than some amount (the amount varies by locale)
petit larceny, petty, petty larceny - larceny of property having a value less than some amount (the amount varies by locale)
skimming - failure to declare income in order to avoid paying taxes on it
rustling - the stealing of cattle
Adj.1.thieving - given to thievery
dishonest, dishonorable - deceptive or fraudulent; disposed to cheat or defraud or deceive

thieving

noun
1. theft, stealing, robbery, burglary, shoplifting, embezzlement, pilfering, larceny an ex-con who says he's given up thieving
adjective
1. dishonest, bent (informal), crooked (informal), light-fingered, larcenous, thievish a thieving grocer who put sand in the sugar
Translations
varastaminenvarastelevavarastelu

thieving

[ˈθiːvɪŋ]
A. ADJladrón
B. Nrobo m, hurto m

thieving

[ˈθiːvɪŋ] n (= theft) → vol m (larcin)

thieving

adj magpiediebisch; keep your thieving hands off my cigaretteslass die Finger weg von meinen Zigaretten (inf); this thieving lot (inf)diese Räuberbande (inf)
n (= thefts)Stehlen nt, → Diebstähle pl

thieving

[ˈθiːvɪŋ]
1. adjladro/a
you thieving scoundrel! → brutto ladruncolo!
2. nfurti mpl
References in classic literature ?
After paying this tribute to what is normal in the constitution of society (for the idea of thieving appeared to his instinct as normal as the idea of property), Chief Inspector Heat felt very angry with himself for having stopped, for having spoken, for having taken that way at all on the ground of it being a short cut from the station to the headquarters.
Maybe make an honest living instead of thieving off us?
He said: "We are heartily sick of working hard through this depression, trying to keep our staff in jobs while thieving scum raid our premises.