thigh


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Related to thigh: hip

thigh

 (thī)
n.
1.
a. The portion of the human leg between the hip and the knee.
b. The corresponding part of the hind leg of a quadruped or other vertebrate animal.
2. The second segment of a bird's leg, containing the tibia and fibula.
3. A cut of meat taken from this part of an animal's body, especially from poultry.

[Middle English, from Old English thēoh; see teuə- in Indo-European roots.]

thigh

(θaɪ)
n
1. (Anatomy) the part of the leg between the hip and the knee in man
2. (Zoology) the corresponding part in other vertebrates and insects
[Old English thēh; related to Old Frisian thiāch, Old High German dioh thigh, Old Norse thjō buttock, Old Slavonic tyku fat]

thigh

(θaɪ)

n.
1. the part of the lower limb in humans between the hip and the knee.
2. the corresponding part of the hind limb of other animals; the femoral region.
[before 900; Middle English thi, thigh(e), the(h), Old English thēh, thīoh, thēoh, c. Old Frisian thiāch, Old High German dioh, Old Norse thjō]

thigh

  • ham, hamstring - Originally, the part of the leg behind the knee was called the ham, and then the tendon near the ham was the hamstring; by extension, the ham became the thigh and buttock together.
  • haunch - The buttock and thigh together.
  • hockshin, gambrel - The underside of the thigh is the hockshin or gambrel.
  • thigh - Etymologically, the "plump" part of the leg, from an Indo-European base meaning "swell" or "fat."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thigh - the part of the leg between the hip and the kneethigh - the part of the leg between the hip and the knee
musculus adductor brevis - the short adductor muscle of the thigh
musculus adductor longus - the long adductor muscle of the thigh
great adductor muscle, musculus adductor magnus - the muscle that adducts and extends the thigh
musculus quadriceps femoris, quadriceps, quadriceps femoris, quad - a muscle of the thigh that extends the leg
arteria circumflexa femoris, circumflex artery of the thigh - an artery that supplies the hip joint and thigh muscles
arteria femoralis, femoral artery - the chief artery of the thigh; a continuation of the external iliac artery
femoral vein, vena femoralis - a vein that accompanies the femoral artery in the same sheath; a continuation of the popliteal vein; becomes the external iliac vein
limb - one of the jointed appendages of an animal used for locomotion or grasping: arm; leg; wing; flipper
leg - a human limb; commonly used to refer to a whole limb but technically only the part of the limb between the knee and ankle
lap - the upper side of the thighs of a seated person; "he picked up the little girl and plopped her down in his lap"
anterior crural nerve, femoral nerve, nervus femoralis - one of a pair of nerves that originate from lumbar nerves and supply the muscles and skin of the anterior part of the thigh
femoris, femur, thighbone - the longest and thickest bone of the human skeleton; extends from the pelvis to the knee
femoral biceps, musculus biceps femoris - the biceps muscle of the thigh; it flexes the knee and rotates the leg laterally
articulatio coxae, coxa, hip joint, hip - the ball-and-socket joint between the head of the femur and the acetabulum
2.thigh - the upper joint of the leg of a fowl
helping, serving, portion - an individual quantity of food or drink taken as part of a meal; "the helpings were all small"; "his portion was larger than hers"; "there's enough for two servings each"
bird, fowl - the flesh of a bird or fowl (wild or domestic) used as food
dark meat - the flesh of the legs of fowl used as food

thigh

noun
Related words
adjectives femoral, crural
Translations
stehno
lår
reisi
bedro
combfelsőcomb
læri
넓적다리
augšstilbsciska
coapsă
stegno
lår
ต้นขา
đùi

thigh

[θaɪ]
A. Nmuslo m
B. CPD thigh bone Nfémur m

thigh

[ˈθaɪ] ncuisse fthigh bone thighbone [ˈθaɪbəʊn] nfémur m

thigh

n(Ober)schenkel m

thigh

:
thighbone
thigh-length
adj bootsübers Knie reichend; coatkurz

thigh

[θaɪ] ncoscia

thigh

(θai) noun
the part of the leg between the knee and hip.

thigh

فَخْذ stehno lår Oberschenkel μηρός muslo reisi cuisse bedro coscia 넓적다리 dij lår udo coxa бедро lår ต้นขา but đùi 大腿

thigh

n. muslo, porción de la extremidad inferior entre la cadera y la rodilla;
___ bonefémur.

thigh

n muslo
References in classic literature ?
Not until I was safe from them did I turn my attention to that live agony on my thigh.
With that sort of spiced food provided for his anxious thought, watchful for strange men, strange beasts, strange turns of the tide, he would make the best of his way up, a military seaman with a short sword on thigh and a bronze helmet on his head, the pioneer post- captain of an imperial fleet.
As they were eating the inward meats {25} and burning the thigh bones [on the embers] in the name of Neptune, Telemachus and his crew arrived, furled their sails, brought their ship to anchor, and went ashore.
cried he suddenly, smiting his hand upon his thigh "I have it now
It tasted something as I should conceive a royal cutlet from the thigh of Louis le Gros might have tasted, supposing him to have been killed the first day after the venison season, and that particular venison season contemporary with an unusually fine vintage of the vineyards of Champagne.
The pitiful groans from all sides and the torturing pain in his thigh, stomach, and back distracted him.
2) Dionysus, after his untimely birth from Semele, was sewn into the thigh of Zeus.
Porthos had received a thrust through his arm, and Bicarat one through his thigh.
He had received a ball in his thigh, which had broken the bone.
There were shapely arches, built wholly of thigh bones; there were startling pyramids, built wholly of grinning skulls; there were quaint architectural structures of various kinds, built of shin bones and the bones of the arm; on the wall were elaborate frescoes, whose curving vines were made of knotted human vertebrae; whose delicate tendrils were made of sinews and tendons; whose flowers were formed of knee-caps and toe-nails.
With this, and with my aid, Hands bound up the great bleeding stab he had received in the thigh, and after he had eaten a little and had a swallow or two more of the brandy, he began to pick up visibly, sat straighter up, spoke louder and clearer, and looked in every way another man.
That night master and man passed out in the fields in the open air, and the next day as they were pursuing their journey they saw coming towards them a man on foot with alforjas at the neck and a javelin or spiked staff in his hand, the very cut of a foot courier; who, as soon as he came close to Don Quixote, increased his pace and half running came up to him, and embracing his right thigh, for he could reach no higher, exclaimed with evident pleasure, "O Senor Don Quixote of La Mancha, what happiness it will be to the heart of my lord the duke when he knows your worship is coming back to his castle, for he is still there with my lady the duchess