thine


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thine

 (thīn)
pron. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
Used to indicate the one or ones belonging to thee.
adj.A possessive form of thou1
Used instead of thy before an initial vowel or h: "The presidential candidates are practicing the first rule of warfare: know thine enemy" (Eleanor Clift).

[Middle English thin; see thy.]

thine

(ðaɪn)
determiner
archaic
a. (preceding a vowel) of, belonging to, or associated in some way with you (thou): thine eyes.
b. (as pronoun): thine is the greatest burden.
Compare thy
[Old English thīn; related to Old High German dīn, Gothic theina]

thine

(ðaɪn)

pron.
1. the possessive case of thou used as a predicate adjective, after a noun or without a noun.
2. the possessive case of thou used as an attributive adjective before a noun beginning with a vowel or vowel sound: thine honor. Compare thy.
3. that which belongs to thee: Thine is the glory.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English thīn, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old High German thīn]
Translations
خاصتُكَ، ما يَخُصّكَلكَ
tvátvůj
din
tiéd
òinn
sana aitseninseninki

thine

[ðaɪn]
A. POSS PRON (o.f., poet) (sing) → (el) tuyo, (la) tuya; (pl) → (los) tuyos, (las) tuyas
for thee and thinepara ti y los tuyos
what is mine is thinelo que es mío es tuyo
B. ADJ (sing) → tu; (pl) → tus

thine

(old, dial)
poss pronder/die/das deine or Deine; for thee and thinefür dich und die deinen or Deinen ? mine1
poss adj (only before vowel) → Euer/Eure/Euer (obs), → dein/deine/dein (also Eccl)

thine

[ðaɪn] poss pron (old) (poet) → il/la tuo/a

thy

(ðai) adjective
an old word for `your' used only when addressing one person, especially God. thy father.
thine (ðain) pronoun
an old word for `yours' used only when addressing one person, especially God. Thine is the glory.
adjective
the form of thy used before a vowel or vowel sound. Thine anger is great; thine honour.
thyˈself pronoun
an old word for `yourself'. Look at thyself.
References in classic literature ?
Lo, that pain itself did the same conscience produce; and the last gleam of that conscience still gloweth on thine affliction.
But thou wouldst go the way of thine affliction, which is the way unto thyself?
It was a July midnight; and from out A full-orbed moon, that, like thine own soul, soaring, Sought a precipitate pathway up through heaven, There fell a silvery-silken veil of light, With quietude, and sultriness, and slumber, Upon the upturned faces of a thousand Roses that grew in an enchanted garden, Where no wind dared to stir, unless on tiptoe -- Fell on the upturn'd faces of these roses That gave out, in return for the love-light, Their odorous souls in an ecstatic death -- Fell on the upturn'd faces of these roses That smiled and died in this parterre, enchanted By thee, and by the poetry of thy presence.
Clad all in white, upon a violet bank I saw thee half reclining; while the moon Fell on the upturn'd faces of the roses, And on thine own, upturn'd- alas, in sorrow!
If, my lord, the beams of that sun that thou holdest eclipsed in thine arms did not dazzle and rob thine eyes of sight thou wouldst have seen by this time that she who kneels at thy feet is, so long as thou wilt have it so, the unhappy and unfortunate Dorothea.
Thou hast thy wife at thy feet, and she whom thou wouldst have for thy wife is in the arms of her husband: reflect whether it will be right for thee, whether it will be possible for thee to undo what Heaven has done, or whether it will be becoming in thee to seek to raise her to be thy mate who in spite of every obstacle, and strong in her truth and constancy, is before thine eyes, bathing with the tears of love the face and bosom of her lawful husband.
When from dark error's subjugation My words of passionate exhortation Had wrenched thy fainting spirit free; And writhing prone in thine affliction Thou didst recall with malediction The vice that had encompassed thee: And when thy slumbering conscience, fretting By recollection's torturing flame, Thou didst reveal the hideous setting Of thy life's current ere I came: When suddenly I saw thee sicken, And weeping, hide thine anguished face, Revolted, maddened, horror-stricken, At memories of foul disgrace.
I sent a warrant to him with thine own royal seal attached, by a right lusty knave, but he beat the messenger and stole the warrant.
Gauge thy gape with buck or goat, Lest thine eye should choke thy throat, After gorging, wouldst thou sleep?
A hide of land I give to thee in my steads of Walbrugham, from me and mine to thee and thine aye and for ever; and God's malison on his head who this gainsays
Administer this draught, therefore, with thine own hand.
And after a time, set before thee thine own example; and examine thyself strictly, whether thou didst not best at first.