thing-in-itself


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

thing-in-it·self

(thĭng′ĭn-ĭt-sĕlf′)
n. pl. things-in-them·selves (thĭngz′ĭn-thĕm-sĕlvz′) Philosophy

[Translation of German Ding an sich.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thing-in-itself

n
(Philosophy) (in the philosophy of Kant) an element of the noumenal rather than the phenomenal world, of which the senses give no knowledge but whose bare existence can be inferred from the nature of experience
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

thing′-in-itself′



n., pl. things′-in-themselves′.
(in Kantian philosophy) reality as it is apart from experience. Compare noumenon.
[1650–60; translation of German Ding an sich]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thing-in-itself - the intellectual conception of a thing as it is in itself, not as it is known through perception
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.