thinghood

thinghood

(ˈθɪŋhʊd)
n
(Philosophy) the state or condition of being a thing or having existence
References in periodicals archive ?
Sachs, whose interpretive approach has been influenced by Martin Heidegger, opts for cumbrous Anglo-Saxon neologisms: "thinghood" for ousia, "being-at-work" for energiea, and, almost ludicrously, "being-at-work-staying-itself" for entelechia.
Wise, The Legal Thinghood of Nonhuman Animals, 23 B.C.
Examining resistance within the embodied ambivalence of thinghood thus offers a useful alternative to conventional depictions of agency as the autonomy of a free subject.
It's elusive and slippery because it can refer to many things, but in the sense that it's detached from having only a racial referent, it's something that everybody can talk about and has to talk about, whether you're addressing the thinghood of the slave relation or blackness as a signifier of multiplicity.
which is a theory of the "thinghood" of objects of property:
The film really illustrates the idea of sudden experience of God (exaphanes) expressed by Manoussakis: "When this happens, when my perspective is countered, inversed, returned to me, I am no longer the privileged subject that establishes and constitutes the objectivity of the world (the thinghood of the things), but merely a dative; I become this "to whom" the world, as the world- to-come, is given.
(63) SM Wise, "The Legal Thinghood of Nonhuman Animals" (1996) 23 Boston College Envtl Aff L Rev 471.
We know that Dasein, world, discourse, and thinghood are phenomena of phenomenology--and so, for that matter, is attunement, including the exceptional attunement: anxiety.
There is no stick corresponding to the glue that "thinghood" provides in this set-up.