thingliness

thingliness

(ˈθɪŋlɪnəs)
n
(Philosophy) the quality of having existence or of being a thing
References in periodicals archive ?
the artwork is something over and above its thingliness.
Thingliness serves as a third option not recognized by a binarized worldview; it not only blurs the separating line between human and nonhuman, but it operates as an amorphous and porous space of becoming between the two.
2) In this way, the decision does not occur as a reflective resolution to a present context, but rather irrupts as the suspension of the context itself--for example, a memorial to a lover becomes the event of an infinite coming and going exacted by the finite thingliness of the candy wrappers.
By forcibly feeding strikers, officials reveal the state's ability to indefinitely suspend human beings in the threshold state between active embodiment and symbolically charged thingliness (Peters, 2005).
Both of their projects abjured the obdurate thingliness of objects for the ephemerality of speech and movement; both recounted personal histories of dance, calling on the memory of their performers and the imagination of their viewers; both reflected on how to present, memorialize, and materialize dance in relation to the museum.
Reality is grounded in thingliness (describing "reality" from the perspective of individual things (8) we fail in our attempt to get at the being of a thing in its originality).
Several of the essays in Wordsworth's Poetic Theory in fact draw upon what Bill Brown and other theorists herald as "thing theory," concerning the connections between culture, including poetry, and material thingliness, where a "thing" is that which precedes the categorized object apprehended through perception and representation.
The object in its irreducible thingliness becomes a middle ground, or a third term, that enables the imaginative negotiation of relations between past and present while safeguarding the autonomy of the past against the cultural preoccupations of the present.
Indeed, if one were to be so parochial as to give the credit for associating spring with beginnings to a linguistic cousin, better to give the allusional laurel to Dante, who tells us at the beginning of his equally celebrated account of his own pilgrimage that it was "la dolce stagione"--that sweet season--"quando l'amor divino / mosse di prima quelle cose belle"--when Divine Love first set all beautiful thingliness in motion.
In the fourth and sixth chapters the reader is treated to a variety of insights into the world of thingliness and temporality.
Thus the piece of equipment is half thing, because characterized by thingliness, and yet it is something more; at the same time it is half art work and yet something less, because lacking the self-sufficiency [selbstgenugsamkeit] of the art work.
In my answer I abandoned the reflection theory of historical context and turned instead to Donald Barthelme's Heideggerian conception of the thingliness of art works: "the mysterious shift that takes place as soon as one says that art is not about something but is something" (3).