thingness

thingness

(ˈθɪŋnəs)
n
(Philosophy) the state of being a thing, of being real, of having existence
References in periodicals archive ?
Considered developmentally, for example, physicists observing subatomic particles smashing into each other, at speeds approximating the speed of light, is just a later form of the infant's exploratory sucking reflex, or of the repetitive dropping of bits of bread and other objects from a high seat on to the floor to see what happens: how they fall, how they land, with what results--these are all instances of trying to make sense of the universe's structure of cause and effect thingness.
The point is not to reveal the essence or thingness of the object (Ding an sich) but to regard as beautiful what alone is available to us, that is to say, the object or, more precisely, its appearance.
Happily, I do not think we have to commit ourselves to essentialism or to thingness in order to talk about the effectiveness or agency of traditions--religious or otherwise.
I forgot my name, my humanness, my thingness, all that could be called me or mine.
But Decker's installation was significant for its psychic charge, heightened by time, which revealed the sillis' underlying abjectness; as mass-produced memento mori, the objects were doomed from the outset, expendable in their thingness.
Often it is the very thingness of the book that talks to us.
At the same time, thinking about sensory-rich objects like those I describe here not only raises complicated questions about producing humanness but also about producing thingness.
The early Leaves of Grass, then, through its thingness as book, and also through its powerful use of apostrophe, aided the mourning process through a kind of literary transaction of consolation between the "I" and the "you," or the writer and the reader.
Based on Kristeva's analysis of abjection, Jorgen Veisland examines how Paul Auster combines realism and abstract form in an attempt to capture pure thingness and the in-betweenness of things.
The vessel's thingness does not lie at all in the material of which it consists, but in the void that holds.
We lend them a portion of mind and in return they lend us a sense not of being in another order, but an awareness of our own thingness.
For Brown, there is a thingness in all objects, a "latency (the not yet formed or the not yet formable) and .