thiocarbamide


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thi·o·car·ba·mide

 (thī′ō-kär′bə-mīd′)
n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thiocarbamide

(ˌθaɪəʊˈkɑːbəˌmaɪd)
n
(Elements & Compounds) another name for thiourea
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

thi•o•u•re•a

(ˌθaɪ oʊ yʊˈri ə, -ˈyʊər i ə)

n.
a colorless, solid substance, CH4N2S, used in photography and inorganic synthesis.
[1890–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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According to new report available with Million Insights, Thiourea is an organosulfur compound also termed as thiocarbamide that resembles urea but contains sulfur instead of oxygen.
One such example is the incorporation of Ivocerin and thiocarbamide in photopolymerized resin cements as initiators.11 It is claimed, that Ivocerin(Variolink Esthetic, Ivocalr Vivadent) when exposed to light results in a cleavage of chemical bond within the photo initiator itself, which reacts with monomer to form polymerization network.11
It proposed some drugs that cause halitosis; lithium salts, penicillamine, griseofulvin, thiocarbamide, dimethylsulfoxide, ethyl alcohol, antihistaminics, diuretics, phenothiazines derivatives, tranquilizers, choral hydrate, nitrites and nitrates, amphetamines, paraldehyde, suplatatosilate, bisphosphonates, metronidazole, arsenic salts (9).