third-degree burn


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Related to third-degree burn: fourth-degree burn

third-de·gree burn

(thûrd′dĭ-grē′)
n.
A severe burn that results in the destruction of the skin and sometimes of the underlying tissues.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

third-degree burn

n
(Pathology) pathol See burn123
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

burn1

(bɜrn)

v. burned burnt, burn•ing, v.i.
1. to consume fuel and give off heat, gases, and usu. light; be on fire.
2.
a. to undergo combustion; oxidize.
b. to undergo fission or fusion.
3. (of a fireplace, furnace, etc.) to contain a fire.
4. to give off light; glow brightly: The lights burned all night.
5. to be hot: The pavement burned in the noon sun.
6. to produce or feel sharp pain or a stinging sensation: The whiskey burned in his throat.
7. to be injured, damaged, scorched, or destroyed by fire, heat, or acid.
8. to feel extreme anger.
9. to feel strong emotion: to burn with desire.
10. to sunburn.
11. Slang. to die in an electric chair.
12. to be engraved by or as if by burning: His words burned into her heart.
v.t.
13. to cause to undergo combustion or be consumed partly or wholly by fire.
14. to use as fuel or as a source of light: to burn coal.
15. to sunburn.
16. to injure, damage, scorch, or destroy with or as if with fire.
17. to execute by burning at the stake.
18. to produce with or as if with fire: to burn a hole.
19. to cause sharp pain or a stinging sensation in: The iodine burned his cut.
20. Slang. to cheat, deceive, or swindle: burned by a phony stock deal.
21. to record data on (a compact disc).
22. burn down, to burn to the ground.
23. burn in,
a. (in printing from a photographic negative) to expose (parts of an image) to more light for increased density.
b. to run (a new computer or other electronic system) continuously for several hours or days, as a test of quality before delivery to the purchaser.
24. burn off, (of morning mist) to be dissipated by the warmth of the rising sun.
25. burn out,
a. to cease operating or functioning because of heat, friction, or lack of fuel.
b. to deprive of a place to live, work, etc., by reason of fire.
c. to exhaust (oneself) or become exhausted or apathetic through overwork, stress, or intense activity.
26. burn up,
a. to burn completely.
b. Informal. to make or become angry.
n.
27. a burned place or area.
28. an injury caused by heat, abnormal cold, chemicals, poison gas, or electricity, and characterized by a painful reddening and swelling of the epidermis (first-degree burn), damage extending into the dermis, usu. with blistering (second-degree burn), or destruction of the epidermis and dermis extending into the deeper tissue (third-degree burn).
29. the process or an instance of burning or baking, as in brickmaking.
30. the firing of a rocket engine.
31. Slang. a swindle.
Idioms:
1. burn one's fingers, to suffer injury or loss by meddling or by acting rashly.
2. burn the candle at both ends, to use up one's strength or energy by immoderation.
3. burn the midnight oil, to work, study, etc., until late at night.
[before 900; Middle English bernen, brennen, Old English beornan (intrans.)]
burn′a•ble, adj.

burn2

(bɜrn)

n. Scot.
a brook or rivulet.
[before 900; Middle English b(o)urne, Old English burna, brunna brook]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.third-degree burn - burn characterized by destruction of both epidermis and dermis
burn - an injury caused by exposure to heat or chemicals or radiation
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A third-degree burn may be classified as minor if it involves less than 5 percent of the body surface, 'unless it involves the face, hands, feet, or genitals.
Unfortunately, they came in direct contact with his skin and caused a third-degree burn that required serial debridement at a burn facility (figure).
A medical official at Al Qasimi Hospital told Khaleej Times that the woman was rushed to the emergency room with third-degree burn injuries, which had affected 30 per cent of her body.
"In fact, a first- or second-degree burn may be more painful initially than a third-degree burn, as the nerves have been burned and will not be painful until the overlying skin sloughs off and the underlying tissue and nerve endings are exposed.
In fact, a first- or second-degree burn may be more painful initially than a third-degree burn. In a third-degree burn, the nerves have been burned and will not be painful until the overlying skin sloughs off and the underlying tissue and nerve endings are exposed.
"She had second-degree burns to both hands and her left knee, a minor first-degree on her right foot and a third-degree burn the size of a nickel on the back of her hand," Mr.
Marine Corps veteran paralyzed during service, received third-degree burn injuries from the defective devices in his Jeep Grand Cherokee.
This can result in the burn becoming a third-degree burn. Presentation of peeling and/or white, charred skin and symptoms of shock are not uncommon.
At 140[degrees!, a common setting in many homes, a child can get a third-degree burn in three seconds.
Dana Vulin, a third-degree burn victim from Perth, Australia, revealed her miraculous transformation.
The general rule of severity defines greater than 30 percent first-degree burns, greater than 20 percent second-degree burns and greater than 10 percent third-degree burn is considered severe and victims should seek the attention of a medical professional.
Sunday Mail medic Dr Gareth Smith said: "If enough skin is ripped off, it is more or less the same as a third-degree burn. If it's not healing properly, I would recommend the lady consults a plastic surgeon."