thisness


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thisness

(ˈðɪsnəs)
n
the state or quality of being 'this' rather than 'that' (used to distinguish one thing from another)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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By contrast, Cristopner Crosbie maintains that this play does not negotiate epistemology, but rather engages Aristotelian ontology and the metaphysics of haecceity or 'thisness." He holds that while the play entertains a fundamentally nominalist picture, the community of Ephesus ultimately agrees to put faith in a stable realist metaphysics, although "the play does this by showing how an otherwise compromised nominalist epistemology, when distributed across a network of likeminded people, can facilitate the fideistic leap to this realistic metaphysic, even while masking the fideism intrinsic to such an approach"; "The Comedy of Errors, Haecceity, and the Metaphysics of Individuation," in Renaissance Papers, ed.
(27) Though literary critic and professor James Wood is concerned strictly with fiction, he, too, writes about the relationship between details and truth by drawing on the medieval concept of haecceitas, or "thisness." A detail with "thisness" is one that "draws abstraction towards itself and seems to kill that abstraction with a puff of palpability, any detail that centres our attention with its concretion." (28) A detail with "thisness," he writes, "seems really true." (29)
The resemblance of inscape to Scotus's principle of individuation, haecceitas or "thisness," is often marshaled to make Hopkins's term appear as though it names a quality more conceptually definite than it does and therefore one more easily representable.
In other words, is anything lost due to his one-sided focus on the inside of experience in the call of conscience and his neglect of the outwardness of experience in the thisness of interpersonal encounter?
(9.) This is a term coined by Duns Scotus (haecceitas, "haecceity," or "thisness", "here and now"), referring to his theory of individuation which Charles Sanders Peirce later adopted in a similar way regarding the state of an object which, in its haecceity, is never immediately known and yet is endowed with a positive, non-qualitative mode of individuation.
For adequate attention to be given to a problem identified through inquiry, it is inappropriate to erase from a serious research report the things that create what Thompson (2002) calls thisness in relation to place.
This is a jambalaya, where the very Andouille sausage takes on its 'is-ness', and gets its 'thisness' ONLY in relation to the other ingredients and vice versa ...
The Waves therefore is of special interest because here Woolf engages fully in her quest for the essence of reality (the itness or thisness of life), which is why the question of identity comes up with such power at the meeting point between mysticism and modernism (Warner 2008: 33), and, we should add, seemingly under the power of the romantics' theory of the unity of being.
In envisaging himself as a writer of playbills and God's theater manager, Coleridge was expressing the power of ephemerality as a way of apprehending or actualizing the "thisness" or haeccity of time: as the New Monthly Magazine writer said of John Genest: one could "look," "file," and "extract," and the momentariness of experience might still be there.
(a) As in Hopkins's sprung rhythm, it may be a conduit of thisness or haecceity, of instress; by stressing a syllable we ask it to stress us, to stress a responsiveness in us, to trigger a revelatory contact, an insight and a relationship (of wonder, awe, empathy, horror, etc.); what can we perceptually reach for through stress?
In any case, we must keep in mind that the thisness of Dietrich, that is, the being of something in actu, follows unmistakably from the interior intellectual quality of being thought in the mind.