thonder

thonder

(ˈðɒndər)
adv, determiner
a Scot word for yonder
[C19: of uncertain origin]
References in periodicals archive ?
that through she passed, as a thonder bolt / Perceth the yielding ayre" (25.
Chaucer makes much of the Parson's walking, especially, for even if this humblest pilgrim finds feet too lowly for the creation of Eve, they are his own major devotional resource: though his parishioners live "fer asonder," he does not fail, in "reyne ne thonder /[.
250 With redde letters written in paper And to the cake as to oure maker To trust they did vs teache For the thonder to the holly bell And at our dethe the holly candel
But vpon soche persones as passed by, laughing and hauing a good sport at it, Socrates also for his part, laughed again as fast as the best, saiyng: Naie, I thought verie well in my minde, and did easily Prophecie, that after so greate a thonder, would come a raine.