thonder

thonder

(ˈðɒndər)
adv, determiner
a Scot word for yonder
[C19: of uncertain origin]
References in periodicals archive ?
We'd left Colombo behind but now we were to make the acquaintance of a Harris Hawk called Thonder that my wife Jenny spotted sitting quietly on a railing with his keeper, Norberto.
We'd left Colombo behind but now we were to make the acquaintance of a Harris Hawk called Thonder who my wife Jenny spotted sitting quietly on a railing with his keeper, Norberto.
These words can be compared with the close of Eleanor's story, where her final removal from Westminster is described as taking place during a storm of 'thonder, lightnyng, hayll and rayne, pat the peple were sore adredde and agast of the grete noyse and hydous of weder' (p.
(21) Britomart, by contrast, "Assayld the flame, the which eftesoones gaue place, / [....] that through she passed, as a thonder bolt / Perceth the yielding ayre" (25.4-7).
Chaucer makes much of the Parson's walking, especially, for even if this humblest pilgrim finds feet too lowly for the creation of Eve, they are his own major devotional resource: though his parishioners live "fer asonder," he does not fail, in "reyne ne thonder /[...] to visite / The ferreste in his parisshe, muche and lite, / Upon his feet, and in his hand a staf" (I 491-95).
250 With redde letters written in paper And to the cake as to oure maker To trust they did vs teache For the thonder to the holly bell And at our dethe the holly candel
We'd left Colombo behind but now we were to make the acquaintance of a Harris Hawk called Thonder who my wife, Jenny, spotted sitting quietly on a railing with his keeper, Norberto.
But vpon soche persones as passed by, laughing and hauing a good sport at it, Socrates also for his part, laughed again as fast as the best, saiyng: Naie, I thought verie well in my minde, and did easily Prophecie, that after so greate a thonder, would come a raine.