thoracic duct


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Related to thoracic duct: right lymphatic duct, thoracic duct ligation

thoracic duct

n.
The main duct of the lymphatic system, ascending through the thoracic cavity in front of the spinal column and discharging lymph and chyle into the blood through the left subclavian vein.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thoracic duct

n
(Anatomy) the major duct of the lymphatic system, beginning below the diaphragm and ascending in front of the spinal column to the base of the neck
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

thorac′ic duct′


n.
the main trunk of the lymphatic system, passing along the spinal column in the thoracic cavity and conveying a large amount of lymph and chyle into the venous circulation.
[1720–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thoracic duct - the major duct of the lymphatic systemthoracic duct - the major duct of the lymphatic system
lymphatic system, systema lymphaticum - the interconnected system of spaces and vessels between body tissues and organs by which lymph circulates throughout the body
lymph vessel, lymphatic vessel - a vascular duct that carries lymph which is eventually added to the venous blood circulation
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several authors recommend interventional or surgical approaches (thoracic duct ligation, pleurodesis, and pleuroperitoneal shunt) in such cases (3, 4).
On MRI, it showed a cystic swelling with no connection with any major vessels or the thoracic duct (Fig.
Injury to lung parenchyma, lung vessels, aorta, thoracic duct, and mediastinal structures including heart, esophagus, diaphragm, vagus nerve, and solid abdominal organs such as liver, spleen, bowel, and formation of bronchopleural fistula does exist.
In some cases, PB has been due to lymphatic leakage into the bronchi either from surgical trauma or pulmonary lymphatic abnormalities, with resolution of the condition after ligation of the thoracic duct [1].
In the present case, pericardiectomy combined with thoracic duct ligation and pleurodesis cured chylous ascites and chylothorax caused by constrictive pericarditis, which has never been previously described.
Perhaps the most celebrated lecturer associated with the university's heyday of anatomical research, the Danish physician and theologian, Thomas Bartholin (1616-1680), is primarily renowned for his discovery of the lymphatic system and for his detailed description of the thoracic duct. A prolific author, Bartholin published widely on topics ranging from theology to refrigeration anesthesia.
Lymphoedema is a condition of localised fluid retention and tissue swelling caused by a compromised lymphatic system, which normally returns interstitial fluid to the thoracic duct, then the bloodstream.
(1,2) They most commonly occur on the left side and are less likely on the right side, where the right lymphatic duct drainage occurs or rarely where the thoracic duct terminates into the right internal jugular vein.
While some cases of chylous effusions are idiopathic, most are caused by thoracic duct damage due to nontraumatic (e.g., malignancy, primarily lymphoma) or traumatic (e.g., surgical procedures or penetrating injuries) events (3).
Lymph from the lower part of the body drains into the thoracic duct. This duct arises from the cisterna chyli, which lies between the aorta and the inferior vena cava anterior to the bodies of the first and second lumbar vertebrae.
Distant nodal metastases are possible via flow through the thoracic duct. Emboli can flow to regional lymphatics, then to the thoracic duct and arrive in the head and neck region by retrograde flow through intercostal, mediastinal, or supraclavicular lymph vessels.
Synopsis: Lymphedema is a condition of localized fluid retention and tissue swelling caused by a compromised lymphatic system, which normally returns interstitial fluid to the thoracic duct, then the bloodstream.