thoracic outlet syndrome


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thoracic outlet syndrome

n.
Any of several syndromes in which blood vessels or nerves are compressed, usually by an overlying muscle, as they pass from the neck region to the arm, causing pain, numbness, and weakness of the arm and hand.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thoracic outlet syndrome - tingling sensations in the fingers; caused by compression on a nerve supplying the arm
syndrome - a pattern of symptoms indicative of some disease
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References in periodicals archive ?
Images in vascular medicine: iatrogenic thoracic outlet syndrome. Vasc Med 2005; 10: 327-8.
Thoracic outlet syndrome with arm ischemia as a complication of cervical rib.
Athletes with nonspecific thoracic outlet syndrome present with postexertional fatigue and pain of the upper extremity, usually along the medial forearm and into the hand.
May, a laboratory technologist, woke up one morning to find that, "My right shoulder and arm were extremely painful and completely useless." She was diagnosed with Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS).
* Meaningful directed second opinion--where unusually high numbers of surgeries are being done (e.g., hysterectomies, thoracic outlet syndrome, etc.) even with apparent record adequacy.
* Thoracic outlet syndrome - This involves compression of the nerves and blood vessels between the neck and shoulder.
According to several authors, it is one of the causes of thoracic outlet syndrome and it is consider to be implicated in the Paget-Von-Schrotter syndrome pathogenesis.
Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is caused by compression of the subclavian artery, vein, or brachial plexus.
He did not have any signs or symptoms of thoracic outlet syndrome. On abduction of the right arm to 90 degrees, a fibrous subcutaneous cord was observed extending 10 cm from the axilla along the medial aspect of the arm.
Thoracic outlet syndrome. In: Skirven TM, Osterman AL, Fedorczyk JM, et al, eds.
They are- Rotator cuff tear, Biceps tendon rupture, Acute calcific tendinitis, Adhesive capsulitis, Acromioclavicular arthritis, Glenohumeral arthritis, Septic arthritis, Rheumatoid arthritis, Gout, Lyme disease, Lupus erythematosus, Spondyloarthropathy, Avascular necrosis, Cervical radiculopathy, Tumor, Thoracic outlet syndrome. (4,5)

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