thoracopagus


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Related to thoracopagus: pygopagus, omphalopagus

thoracopagus

a fetal abnormality, consisting of twins joined at the thorax.
See also: Birth
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They are further classified into eight basic types relative to their site(s) of union or pagus (Greek for joined): Omphalopagus (umbilicus/abdomen), thoracopagus (thorax/upper abdomen), cephalopagus (maxillofacial), craniopagus (skull), ischiopagus (pelvis), rachipagus (spine) and pygopagus (sacrum).
The ventrally united twins may fuse at the oral end of the disc at the level of the septum transversum, the cardiogenic region, or the oropharyngeal membranes resulting in omphalopagus, thoracopagus, or cephalopagus.
Wubishet, "Thoracopagus conjoined twins presenting as shoulder dystocia: a case report," Ethiopian Medical Journal, vol.
Conjoined twins that are joined at the chest, or Thoracopagus twins, are one of the most common instances of conjoined twins, and commonly share a liver, upper intestine and may have a shared heart, (http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/conjoined-twins/symptoms-causes/dxc-20198093) according to the Mayo Clinic.
Unusual cardiac malformations in conjoined twins: thoracopagus twins with conjoined pentalogy of Cantrell and an omphalopagus twin with atretic ventricles.
thoracopagus type contained single heart with A-V septal defect with single umbilical cord contained two vessels with excess ammiotic fluid (AFI-24).
The two thorax of present monster were fused per-cutaneously from lateral sides (thoracopagus) in area of rib cage.
(5) Splenogonadal fusion can either be continuous, in which the direct anatomical connection between the spleen and the gonad persists, or discontinuous, in which there is no direct connection between the two organs, and the splenic tissue is solitarily attached to the gonad.'' In one third of cases, continuous splenogonadal fusion is associated with congenital anomalies such as cleft palate, cardiac defects, micrognathia, spina bifida, thoracopagus, osteogenesis imperfecta and extremity deformitiesP.
Conjoined twins represent an uncommon congenital malformation, with an estimated incidence of 1: 50,000-1: 100,000,1 and approximate 75 Percent of cases are females.2,3 Usually, conjoined twins are classified according to the most prominent site of conjunction: thorax (thoracopagus) 40 Percent , abdomen (xiphopagus and omphalopagus) 33 Percent , sacrum (pygopagus) 18 Percent , pelvis (ischiopagus) 6 Percent , and craniopagus (1-2 Percent).3,4
The thoracopagus is the most common type, accounting for 40% of all conjoined twins cases (2).