thornbill


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thornbill

(ˈθɔːnˌbɪl)
n
1. (Animals) any of various South American hummingbirds of the genera Chalcostigma, Ramphomicron, etc, having a thornlike bill
2. (Animals) Also called: thornbill warbler any of various Australasian wrens of the genus Acanthiza and related genera: family Muscicapidae
3. (Animals) any of various other birds with thornlike bills
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thornbill - any of various South American hummingbirds with a sharp pointed billthornbill - any of various South American hummingbirds with a sharp pointed bill
hummingbird - tiny American bird having brilliant iridescent plumage and long slender bills; wings are specialized for vibrating flight
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The emphasis here is on studying to explain the relationships between emotional intelligence, job performance and cultural adjustment of expatriates as shown in Figure 1 below (Saunders, Lewis and Thornbill, 2009).
If religion is not your family's thing, then dip into history at the Ashoka Pillar dating back to about 232 BC, the 16th century Allahabad Fort, the Thornbill Mayne Memorial and the many museums.
By adding further land to this protected area we can continue to protect rare species of animals such as the Slender-billed Thornbill, Australian Bustard and the Nullarbor Daisy as well as the its spectacular landscape of high cliff, caves and arid plains.
Municipal Finance Journal is available from Panel Publishers, Inc., through UTD Library, 2900 Steeles Avenue E., Suite 212, Thornbill, Ontario L3T 4X1, Canada (800/445-3360) or www.utdlibrary.com/aspenreprint.
As the cool rainforests contracted, so did the habitat of many species of birds, including the golden bowerbird, the fernwren and the mountain thornbill. This contraction fragmented the birds' habitat and saw populations of these endemic species split and become isolated: a process biogeographers call `vicariance'.
The Australian dusky grasswren (Amytornis purnelli, Maluridae), the slate-backed thornbill (Acanthiza robustirostris, Acanthizidae), and the grey-headed honeyeater (Licheneostomus keartlandi, Meliphagi-dae) are the only Australian birds endemic to the central desert.
It was reported in Wild Life in 1939 that Ray T Littlejohns (famed for his work on the Superb Lyrebird Menura novaehollandiae and Mistletoebird Dicaeum hirundinaceum, and a president of the Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union) had been experimenting with the use of an automated camera with an 'open flash-lamp' in order to take pictures of the Yellow-rumped Thornbill Acanthiza chrysorrhoa in its nest.
peregrinus); the zebra finch (Poephila guttata) and 15 species of thornbill (Pardalotidae) are also present.