threepence

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three·pence

 (thrĕp′əns, thrĭp′-, thrŭp′-)
n. pl. threepence or three·penc·es
1. A coin worth three pennies, formerly used in Great Britain.
2. The sum of three pennies.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

threepence

(ˈθrɛpəns)
n
three old pencea paltry amount
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

three•pence

(ˈθrɪp əns, ˈθrɛp-, ˈθrʌp-; spelling pron. ˈθriˌpɛns)

n.
1. (used with a sing. or pl. v.) Brit. a sum of three pennies.
2. a former coin of the United Kingdom, equal to three pennies.
[1580–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.threepence - former cupronickel coin of the United Kingdom equal to three penniesthreepence - former cupronickel coin of the United Kingdom equal to three pennies
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
coin - a flat metal piece (usually a disc) used as money
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

threepence

[ˈθrepəns] N (Brit) → tres peniques mpl
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
To supply the demand, the General Court passed a law for establishing a coinage of shillings, sixpences, and threepences. Captain John Hull was appointed to manufacture this money, and was to have about one shilling out of every twenty to pay him for the trouble of making them.
At last it came into the man's head that he would not go on thus without pay any longer; so he went to his master, and said, 'I have worked hard for you a long time, I will trust to you to give me what I deserve to have for my trouble.' The farmer was a sad miser, and knew that his man was very simple-hearted; so he took out threepence, and gave him for every year's service a penny.
Sir Clifford thinks of charging twopence for a peep at the whispering gallery in the spinal column; threepence to hear the echo in the hollow of his cerebellum; and sixpence for the unrivalled view from his forehead.
'That,' rejoined the secretary, doing as he was told, 'is all-- except Mrs Varden's box (fourteenth time of opening), seven shillings and sixpence in silver and copper, and half-a-guinea in gold; and Miggs (being the saving of a quarter's wages), one-and- threepence.'
Agatha, who came last but one, gave him threepence.
Threepence. That's the way we're taxed in this country.
Th' rent of our cottage is only one an' threepence an' it's like pullin' eye-teeth to get it.
London in Danger!" He had to give threepence for a copy of that paper.
Here, Deputy (preceded by a flying oyster-shell) appeared upon the scene, and requested to have the sum of threepence instantly
Besides, she was accustomed to glide along the walls with her eyes cast down; for her natural boldness would never show itself through that nun-like mien except when bargaining, if only on a matter of threepence. Such a turn- out had never been presented to her notice before.
My own earliest boating recollection is of five of us contributing threepence each and taking out a curiously constructed craft on the Regent's Park lake, drying ourselves subsequently, in the park-keeper's lodge.