threnos

threnos

(ˈθriːnɒs)
n
(Poetry) another word for threnody
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Here is another rose-tinted reading of tragedy, in which its threnos, its lamentation, must never be separated from "Resurrection or Apotheosis or, in some sense ...
(15) In Threnos, prol.: <<Haec enim involutio Spiritus Sancti explicatur a sacris expositoribus: quia sacrae Scripturae eodem spiritu sunt expositae quo sunt editae, sicut dicit Augustinus>>.
Equally, in his explanation of threnos, which is a form of speech 'most passionate, so ought it to be most serious and voyd of fiction and faining', he shuns carelessly expressed or disproportionate affections as, for example, 'when the speaker expresseth a lamentable matter with a cold or carelesse affection' ([L2.sup.r]).
Threnos for 52 string instruments, composed in 1960, is dedicated to the victims of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima and the piano concerto Resurrection was composed as a reaction to the terror attacks of September 11, 2001.
In relating the suffering associated with their reminiscences about the Algerian War, the narrators rely on threnos (lamentation).
(3) His copy of The Poetical Works of William Shakespeare (1806)--acquired in 1819, the year he wrote "Ode on a Grecian Urn"--contains "Threnos," the last five stanzas of "The Phoenix and Turtle." (4) While it is arguable that he read and refers solely to these stanzas, we shall see that he seems to engage the entire poem.
(49) Were it not clear enough that we are dealing with a tragic context, Clitophon gives precise indications that he is following the path of a threnos ('[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]' 'already I shall begin my funeral dirge' 3,10; '[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]' 'a dirge is your marriage-hymn' 3,10; '[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]' 'thus did I silently lament' 3,11).
His September 29 recital will includes works by Bach (Suites 1 and 6), Britten (Suite No 1) and Tavener (Threnos).