throaty

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throat·y

 (thrō′tē)
adj. throat·i·er, throat·i·est
Uttered or sounding as if uttered deep in the throat; guttural, hoarse, or husky.

throat′i·ly adv.
throat′i·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

throaty

(ˈθrəʊtɪ)
adj, throatier or throatiest
1. indicating a sore throat; hoarse: a throaty cough.
2. of, relating to, or produced in or by the throat
3. deep, husky, or guttural
ˈthroatily adv
ˈthroatiness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

throat•y

(ˈθroʊ ti)

adj. throat•i•er, throat•i•est.
(of sound) husky; hoarse; guttural.
[1635–45]
throat′i•ly, adv.
throat′i•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.throaty - sounding as if pronounced low in the throat; "a rich throaty voice"
low-pitched, low - used of sounds and voices; low in pitch or frequency
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

throaty

adjective hoarse, husky, gruff, low, deep, thick, guttural A broad smile and a throaty chuckle were his on-screen trademarks.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
حَلْقي
hrdelní
hæs
rámur, hás, dimmur

throaty

[ˈθrəʊtɪ] ADJ (throatier (compar) (throatiest (superl))) [person, voice] → ronco, afónico; [laugh] → gutural; [roar of engine] → ronco
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

throaty

[ˈθrəʊti] adj (= hoarse) [voice, laugh] → de gorge
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

throaty

adj (+er), throatily
advkehlig, rau
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

throaty

[ˈθrəʊtɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (voice) → roco/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

throat

(θrəut) noun
1. the back part of the mouth connecting the openings of the stomach, lungs and nose. She has a sore throat.
2. the front part of the neck. She wore a silver brooch at her throat.
-throated
having a (certain type of) throat. a red-throated bird.
ˈthroaty adjective
(of a voice) coming from far back in the throat; deep and hoarse.
ˈthroatily adverb
ˈthroatiness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
She wiped her red old eyes on a corner of her veil, and clucked throatily.
Another Romeo and Juliet, Prokofiev's ballet, is evoked in that composer's Second Violin Concerto, and here soloist Alexander Sitkovetsky continued the current of understatement, blending his tone into the texture of the orchestra whilst still coaxing his instrument to sing now throatily, now sweetly, and always in narrative mode.
"What's normal, anyway?" she asked the camera throatily.
I throatily grunted as I pulled into my anchor, bringing my Muzzy to rest an inch in front of the arrow rest, with 68 pounds of stored energy ready to send it on its way.
In Lingard's case, that meant throatily joining in with a chant that emphasised the antipathy between United and City.
"And for you," she laughed, "I got --a clue, 'cause you really need one!" She pulled me to her fiercely, muttered throatily, "C'mere, ya big gorilla!" and puckered up for a kiss.
Meanwhile Charlie Griffiths is a throatily evil Queen Morgana who stalks, snarls, and performs a stellar version of Defying Gravity which I hope the adults appreciate even if it goes over tots' heads.
He laughed throatily as they all entered Radu's almost one- hundred-square-meter living room, where two big tables were brimming with all sorts of starters, snacks, bottles of alcohol and sodas.
Frances de la Tour ("you remember our friend Violet") continues to drop by unannounced to purr throatily over Ash, but it's their other dotty friend Penelope (Marcia Warren) who delivers one of the funniest lines of the night.