thrustful


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thrust

 (thrŭst)
v. thrust, thrust·ing, thrusts
v.tr.
1. To push or drive quickly and forcefully: thrust a pole into the ground. See Synonyms at push.
2. To cause to project or extend: poplars thrusting their branches upward; thrust out his finger.
3.
a. To force into a specified condition or situation: He was thrust into a position of awesome responsibility.
b. To force or impose on an unwilling or improper recipient: "Some have greatness thrust upon them" (Shakespeare).
4. Archaic To stab; pierce.
v.intr.
1. To shove something into or at something else: thrust at his opponent's chest with a foil.
2. To grow or extend upwards: "The cathedral ... thrust up suddenly, much taller than the surrounding houses" (Leonard Michaels).
3. To force one's way; press forward: "I watched a young hare thrust through periwinkle under the window" (Sam Pickering).
n.
1.
a. A forceful shove or push: inserted the key with a thrust.
b. A lunge or stab.
2.
a. A driving force or pressure.
b. The forward-directed force developed in a jet or rocket engine as a reaction to the high-velocity rearward ejection of exhaust gases.
c. Outward or lateral stress in a structure, as that exerted by an arch or vault.
3.
a. The essential meaning; the point: the general thrust of his remarks.
b. The central purpose or objective: The whole thrust of the project was to make money.
4. A forceful movement, especially an advance or attack by an armed force.

[Middle English thrusten, from Old Norse thrȳsta; see treud- in Indo-European roots.]

thrust′ful adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thrustful

(ˈθrʌstfʊl)
adj
aggressive or pushy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

thrustful

[ˈθrʌstfʊl] thrusting [ˈθrʌstɪŋ] ADJemprendedor, vigoroso, dinámico (pej) → agresivo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

thrustful

, thrusting
adj person, behaviourenergisch, zielstrebig, resolut; (pej)(etwas) zu zielstrebig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Welsh backs more thrustful. Pack should more than hold its own."
Mali, however, had seemed much more thrustful in the first half, carrying out a number of fast raids into the opponent citadel.
After good, thrustful, running from centre Adam Warren and hammering away from the forwards, it was flanker Evans who went over from close range, with the Dragons now looking well in control.