carcinoma

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car·ci·no·ma

 (kär′sə-nō′mə)
n. pl. car·ci·no·mas or car·ci·no·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
An invasive malignant tumor derived from epithelial tissue that tends to metastasize to other areas of the body.

[Latin, cancerous ulcer, from Greek karkinōma, from karkinos, cancer; see kar- in Indo-European roots.]

car′ci·no′ma·toid (-nō′mə-toid′) adj.
car′ci·nom′a·tous (-nŏm′ə-təs, -nō′mə-) adj.

carcinoma

(ˌkɑːsɪˈnəʊmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
1. (Pathology) any malignant tumour derived from epithelial tissue
2. (Pathology) another name for cancer1
[C18: from Latin, from Greek karkinōma, from karkinos cancer]
ˌcarciˈnomaˌtoid, ˌcarciˈnomatous adj

car•ci•no•ma

(ˌkɑr səˈnoʊ mə)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
a malignant tumor composed of epithelial tissue.
[1715–25; < Latin: ulcer, tumor < Greek karkínōma < karkinō-, variant s. of karkinoûsthai to become cancerous, derivative of karkínos ulcerous sore, literally, crab (compare cancer)]
car`ci•no′ma•toid`, adj.
car`ci•no′ma•tous, adj.

car·ci·no·ma

(kär′sə-nō′mə)
A cancerous growth on the surface of the skin, blood vessels, or other organ or structure.

carcinoma

1. a malignant tumor that may spread to surrounding tissue and distant areas of the body.
2. any kind of epithelial cancer. — carcinomatous, adj.
See also: Cancer

carcinoma

A malignant growth or tumor of cancerous surface tissues.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carcinoma - any malignant tumor derived from epithelial tissuecarcinoma - any malignant tumor derived from epithelial tissue; one of the four major types of cancer
cancer of the liver, liver cancer - malignant neoplastic disease of the liver usually occurring as a metastasis from another cancer; symptoms include loss of appetite and weakness and bloating and jaundice and upper abdominal discomfort
cancer, malignant neoplastic disease - any malignant growth or tumor caused by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division; it may spread to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system or the blood stream
adenocarcinoma, glandular cancer, glandular carcinoma - malignant tumor originating in glandular epithelium
breast cancer - cancer of the breast; one of the most common malignancies in women in the US
carcinoma in situ, preinvasive cancer - a cluster of malignant cells that has not yet invaded the deeper epithelial tissue or spread to other parts of the body
colon cancer - a malignant tumor of the colon; early symptom is bloody stools
embryonal carcinoma - malignant neoplasm of the testis
endometrial cancer, endometrial carcinoma - cancer of the uterine lining
lung cancer - carcinoma of the lungs; one of the commonest forms of cancer
mesothelioma - a form of carcinoma of the mesothelium lining lungs or abdomen or heart; usually associated with exposure to asbestos dust
oat cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma - highly malignant carcinoma composed of small round or egg-shaped cells with little cytoplasm; lung cancers are frequently oat cell carcinomas
oral cancer - malignant neoplasm of the lips of mouth; most common in men over the age of 60
pancreatic cancer - cancer of the pancreas
seminoma, testicular cancer - malignant tumor of the testis; usually occurring in older men
skin cancer - a malignant neoplasm of the skin
trophoblastic cancer - malignant neoplasm of the uterus derived from the epithelium of the chorion
Translations
سَرَطانٌ في الأنْسِجَه
karcinomrakovinný nádor
cancerkræft
kanserkötücül ur

carcinoma

[ˌkɑːsɪˈnəʊmə] N (carcinomas or carcinomata (pl)) [ˌkɑːsɪˈnəʊmətə]carcinoma m

carcinoma

nKarzinom nt

carcinoma

[ˌkɑːsɪˈnəʊmə] n (Med) → carcinoma m

carcinoma

(kaːsi'nəumə) plural carcinomata (kaːsi'nəumətə)
malignant tumor. The surgeons had to remove the carcinoma from his lungs

car·ci·no·ma

n. carcinoma, tumor canceroso invasivo.

carcinoma

n carcinoma m; basal cell — carcinoma basocelular; bronchogenic — carcinoma broncogénico; ductal — in situ carcinoma ductal in situ; hepatocellular— carcinoma hepatocelular; lobular — carcinoma lobulillar or lobular; non-small-cell — carcinoma de células no pequeñas; renal cell — carcinoma de células renales; small-cell — carcinoma de células pequeñas; squamous cell — carcinoma escamo-celular or de células escamosas; transitional cell — carcinoma de células transicionales
References in periodicals archive ?
Tiziana said the data was consistent with earlier long-term safety and clinical activity tests of Milciclib in "thymic carcinoma, thymoma and other solid cancers".
In a Phase 1 study, oral treatment with Milciclib was well-tolerated and the drug showed promising clinical responses in patients with advanced solid malignancies such as in NSCLC, pancreatic and colon cancer, thymic carcinoma and thymoma.
The classification by Marino and Muller-Hermelink distinguishes medullary, mixed, predominantly cortical, cortical thymoma, well-differentiated thymic carcinoma, and other rare types of thymic carcinoma (7).
Thymoma and thymic carcinoma in children and adolescents: a report from the European Cooperative Study Group for Pediatric Rare Tumors (EXPeRT).
My extremely healthy, former Army Ranger and Gulf War 1 helicopter pilot, significant other (SO) was diagnosed with Stage 4 thymic carcinoma, a terminal and rare type of cancer.
More recently, she has participated in three trials in her latest battle against recurrent thymic carcinoma, an extremely rare, fast-growing cancer of the thymus gland.
Diagnoses included thymoma (n=7), thymic hyperplasia (n=8), lymphoma (n=4), thymic carcinoma (n=3), and invasive lung cancer (n=3).
When a patient is diagnosed with a mediastinal mass, the differential diagnosis must include thymoma, lymphoma, thymic carcinoma, thymolipoma, germ cell tumors, and lung metastases but also thymic cysts, lymphangiomas, and aortic aneurysms [9,10].
In cases of THA or thymic carcinoma (TC) treatment planning is based on imaging results.
Here we present a case of severe hypercalcemia due to undifferentiated thymic carcinoma involving several hypercalcemia inducing mechanisms that evolved over the course of three admissions.
Up to 50% of patients with thymoma have symptoms consistent with MG, which is common in all types of thymoma but is rare in thymic carcinoma; there is no sex predominance.