thymus


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thy·mus

(thī′məs)
n. pl. thy·mus·es
1. A small glandular organ that is situated behind the top of the breastbone, consisting mainly of lymphatic tissue and serving as the site of T cell differentiation. The thymus increases gradually in size and activity until puberty, after which it begins to atrophy.
2. A similar structure in other vertebrate animals.

[New Latin, from Greek thumos, warty excrescence, thymus.]

thymus

(ˈθaɪməs)
n, pl -muses or -mi (-maɪ)
(Physiology) a glandular organ of vertebrates, consisting in man of two lobes situated below the thyroid. In early life it produces lymphocytes and is thought to influence certain immunological responses. It atrophies with age and is almost nonexistent in the adult
[C17: from New Latin, from Greek thumos sweetbread]

thy•mus

(ˈθaɪ məs)

n., pl. -mus•es, -mi (-mī).
a ductless, butterfly-shaped gland lying at the base of the neck, formed mostly of lymphatic tissue and aiding in the production of T cells of the immune system: after puberty, the lymphatic tissue gradually degenerates. Also called thy′mus gland`.
[1685–95; < New Latin < Greek thýmos]

thy·mus

(thī′məs)
An organ in vertebrate animals located behind the top of the sternum (breastbone) where lymphocytes called T cells develop. In humans, the thymus stops growing in early childhood and gradually shrinks in size through adulthood.

thymus

A lymphoid endocrine gland in the chest involved in immunity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thymus - large genus of Old World mints: thymeThymus - large genus of Old World mints: thyme
asterid dicot genus - genus of more or less advanced dicotyledonous herbs and some trees and shrubs
family Labiatae, family Lamiaceae, Labiatae, Lamiaceae, mint family - a large family of aromatic herbs and shrubs having flowers resembling the lips of a mouth and four-lobed ovaries yielding four one-seeded nutlets and including mint; thyme; sage; rosemary
thyme - any of various mints of the genus Thymus
2.thymus - a ductless glandular organ at the base of the neck that produces lymphocytes and aids in producing immunitythymus - a ductless glandular organ at the base of the neck that produces lymphocytes and aids in producing immunity; atrophies with age
ductless gland, endocrine gland, endocrine - any of the glands of the endocrine system that secrete hormones directly into the bloodstream
immune system - a system (including the thymus and bone marrow and lymphoid tissues) that protects the body from foreign substances and pathogenic organisms by producing the immune response
cervix, neck - the part of an organism (human or animal) that connects the head to the rest of the body; "he admired her long graceful neck"; "the horse won by a neck"
Translations
brzlík
kateenkorva
thymuszwezerik
grasica
brässthymus

thymus

[ˈθaɪməs] N (thymuses, thymi (pl)) [ˈθaɪmaɪ]timo m

thy·mus

n. timo, glándula situada en la parte inferior del cuello y anterosuperior de la cavidad torácica que desempeña un papel de importancia en la función inmunológica.

thymus

n (pl -mi o -muses) timo
References in periodicals archive ?
Normal structures in the prevascular compartment include the thymus, fat, lymph nodes and the left brachiocephalic vein.
3g of retinoic acid via yolk sac to induce a defective model of a thymus with hypoplasia.
The thymus and spleen of mice were separated and weighed.
Chemical-shift and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of thymus in myasthenia gravis: usefulness of quantitative assessment.
KEYWORDS: Aflatoxin, Acetic acid, WBCsDC, Thymus, Harderian gland.
Crooks, co-director of the research center and co-author of the study, said the artificial thymus could eventually be engineered to target and attack cancerous cells.
Previously published as Practical Cardiovascular Pathology and now incorporating the lung and the thymus, this textbook contains 191 chapters by pathologists from the US and Brazil, who outline the clinical features, findings, pathology, differential diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of diseases of all thoracic structures except the esophagus and bony structures, with an emphasis on practical diagnosis.
The report provides comprehensive information on the therapeutics under development for Thymus Cancer, complete with analysis by stage of development, drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type.
The macroscopically described cystic areas corresponded to the parenchyma of the thymus which was defined as an infiltrative tumor tissue.
3] It is the most common neoplasms arising in the thymus originating from epithelial cells of thymus, it accounts for about 25% of all mediastinal tumors with a peak incidence between 40 and 50 years of age.
Thymus plant essential oils possess several pharmacological properties, such as spasmolytic, antiseptic, expectorant, antispasmodic, and anti-inflammatory effects (10-12).