thyrsus

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thyr·sus

 (thûr′səs)
n. pl. thyr·si (-sī) Mythology
A staff tipped with a pine cone and twined with ivy, carried by Dionysus, Dionysian revelers, and satyrs.

[Latin, from Greek thursos.]

thyrsus

(ˈθɜːsəs)
n, pl -si (-saɪ)
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a staff, usually one tipped with a pine cone, borne by Dionysus (Bacchus) and his followers
2. (Botany) a variant spelling of thyrse
[C18: from Latin, from Greek thursos stalk]

thyr•sus

(ˈθɜr səs)

n., pl. -si (-sī).
1. thyrse.
2. a staff tipped with a pine cone and sometimes twined with ivy leaves, borne by Dionysus and his votaries.
[1585–95; < Latin < Greek thýrsos plant stem, thyrsus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thyrsus - a dense flower cluster (as of the lilac or horse chestnut) in which the main axis is racemose and the branches are cymosethyrsus - a dense flower cluster (as of the lilac or horse chestnut) in which the main axis is racemose and the branches are cymose
flower cluster - an inflorescence consisting of a cluster of flowers
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He it was that drove the nursing women who were in charge of frenzied Bacchus through the land of Nysa, and they flung their thyrsi on the ground as murderous Lycurgus beat them with his oxgoad.
Cosmotic predicates are achieved through figures such as: jumps, wielding thyrsi, as well as through the consistently straight posture of the head, neck, hack (in ancient ritualistic dances, (he displaying of weapons had an apotropaic function, protecting against forces which threatened the order of the world).
in Hispania, Thomae ap., Thyrsi et soc., Torquati et ss., Verissimi, Maximae et Iuliae, Vicentii diac.
Under the rim, a frieze of fruiting vines bears witness to their function, and Bacchic symbols on the body including delicate sprays of ivy, thyrsi, tambourines and reed pipes celebrate the joys of wine.
All around them stood the bird cherry with her festoonery of wild hop; the rowan, fresh and mantling like a shepherdess's cheek; the maenad hazel with her verdant thyrsi wreathed in grape-like clusters of pearly nuts.