tic

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tic

 (tĭk)
n.
1. A repetitive, rapid, sudden muscular movement or vocalization, usually experienced as involuntary or semivoluntary.
2. A quirk or habit of behavior or language: common phrases that have become verbal tics.
intr.v. ticced, tic·cing, tics
To have a tic; produce tics: factors that affect the frequency of ticcing.

[French.]

tic

(tɪk)
n
(Pathology) spasmodic twitching of a particular group of muscles
[C19: from French, of uncertain origin; compare Italian ticche]

tic

(tɪk)

n.
1.
a. a sudden, spasmodic, painless, involuntary muscular contraction, as of the face.
2. a persistent behavioral trait; personal quirk.
[1790–1800; < French (of expressive orig.)]

-tic

a suffix, equivalent in meaning to -ic, occurring orig. in adjectives of Greek origin (analytic), and used esp. in the formation of adjectives from nouns ending in -sis: neurotic; systaltic.
[< Greek -tikos, extracted from adjs. derived with -ikos -ic from agent nouns ending in -tēs; compare athlete and athletic]

tic

The involuntary twitching of a muscle normally under voluntary control. Generally a sign of anxiety or insecurity, a tic begins as a deliberate movement that gradually becomes unconscious.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tic - a local and habitual twitching especially in the face
twitch, twitching, vellication - a sudden muscle spasm; especially one caused by a nervous condition

tic

noun twitch, jerk, spasm She developed a tic in her left eye.

tic

noun
A nervous shaking of the body:
Translations
تَشَنُّج عَضَلي
tik
trækning
arcrángás
vöîvakippur
tiks
tik

tic

[tɪk] N (Med) → tic m
a nervous ticun tic nervioso

tic

[ˈtɪk] ntic m

tic

n (Med) → Tick m, → nervöses Zucken

tic

[tɪk] n (Med) → tic m inv

tic

(tik) noun
a nervous, involuntary movement or twitch of a muscle, especially of the face. She has a nervous tic below her left eye.

tic

n tic m; — douloureux tic doloroso, neuralgia del trigémino
References in periodicals archive ?
By this I mean, TS is not a problem for all people who have it, where the erratic impulses are expressed as part of the healthy person, where 'ticcing' maybe as indistinguishable to the individual as the need to win is in someone who is overly competitive.
The current article argues rather that ongoing telic behavioral activity is functionally linked to tic onset and so type of behavioral activity and overall action plan at the time of ticcing should also be assessed.
Feindel rejected claims that specific localized cortical lesions caused ticcing behaviors and instead argued that they resulted from bad habits formed during childhood.