tickets


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tick·et

 (tĭk′ĭt)
n.
1.
a. A paper slip or card indicating that its holder has paid for or is entitled to a specified service, right, or consideration: a theater ticket; an airline ticket.
b. An e-ticket.
2. A certifying document, especially a captain's or pilot's license.
3. An identifying or descriptive tag attached to merchandise; a label.
4. A list of candidates proposed or endorsed by a political party; a slate.
5. A legal notice to a person charged with a violation of law, especially a minor violation.
6. The proper or desirable thing: A change of scene would be just the ticket for us.
7. Informal A means to an end: "He went to Washington ... to become press secretary ... it was his ticket out of the Delta" (Nicholas Lamann).
tr.v. tick·et·ed, tick·et·ing, tick·ets
1. To provide with a ticket for passage or admission: ticket all passengers through to Amsterdam.
2. To attach a ticket to; tag: items that are ticketed in a pawnshop window.
3. To designate for a specified use or end; destine: funds that have been ticketed for research.
4. To serve (a person) with a notice of legal violation: ticket a speeding motorist.

[Obsolete French etiquet, label, note, from Old French estiquet, post serving as a target in certain sports, notice, label, from estiquier, to stick, of Germanic origin; see steig- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tickets

(ˈtɪkɪts)
pl n
informal South African the end; that was it
[of unknown origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
Ticket-collecting is a slow business in the East, where people secrete their tickets in all sorts of curious places.
The hall was full of boys, and at the head of one of the long tables stood the sporting interest, with a hat before them, in which were the tickets folded up.
'Tickets, please!' said the Guard, putting his head in at the window.
The conductor was asking for tickets. Bill showed his mechanically, and the conductor passed on.
"But you've got the tickets. It would be a pity to waste them."
"Then will you go at once and secure tickets for to-night's boat, and bring them here?
He sends for your theater tickets, and pays for them; he sends for any possible article you can require, be it a doctor, an elephant, or a postage stamp; and when you leave, at last, you will find a subordinate seated with the cab-driver who will put you in your railway compartment, buy your tickets, have your baggage weighed, bring you the printed tags, and tell you everything is in your bill and paid for.
Yes, I 'll get two tickets as cheap as I can, send a note to Will, poor lad, he needs fun as much as I do, and we 'll go and have a nice time in some corner, as Charles Lamb and his sister used to."
The young gentleman, at the same time, offered tickets to Miss Nancy and her mother; but the good woman would not accept them.
'Tickets at the bar, Sir,' interposed the waiter; 'half-a-guinea each, Sir.'
"Thar's some tickets in that ar old cracked jug on the top shelf," said Dinah.
I procured a local directory, put fifty tickets in my pocket, dressed myself in nankeen pantaloons and a sky-blue coat (then the height of fashion), and set forth to tout for dancers among all the members of the genteel population, who, not being notorious Puritans, had also not been so obliging as to take tickets for the ball.