ticking


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Related to ticking: ticking bomb

tick·ing

 (tĭk′ĭng)
n.
A strong, tightly woven fabric of cotton or linen used to make pillow and mattress coverings.

ticking

(ˈtɪkɪŋ)
n
(Textiles) a strong cotton fabric, often striped, used esp for mattress and pillow covers
[C17: from tick3]

tick•ing

(ˈtɪk ɪŋ)

n.
any of various strong, durable fabrics in plain, twill, or satin weave, constructed or printed in striped or floral patterns and used esp. to cover mattresses and pillows.
[1635–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ticking - a metallic tapping soundticking - a metallic tapping sound; "he counted the ticks of the clock"
sound - the sudden occurrence of an audible event; "the sound awakened them"
ticktock, tictac, tocktact - steady recurrent ticking sound as made by a clock
2.ticking - a strong fabric used for mattress and pillow covers
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Translations

ticking

[ˈtɪkɪŋ] N
1. [of clock] → tictac m
2. (= material) → cutí m, terliz m

ticking

[ˈtɪkɪŋ] ntic-tac mticking off (British) n (= telling-off) → remontage m de bretelles

ticking

n
(for mattress) → Matratzendrell m; (for pillows etc) → Inlett nt
(of clock)Ticken nt

ticking

1 [ˈtɪkɪŋ] n (of clock, watch) → ticchettio

ticking

2 [ˈtɪkɪŋ] n (material) → tela da materassi
References in classic literature ?
When those two arms touched one another the ticking of the mechanism would cease--for ever.
There was a grave clock, ticking somewhere up the staircase; and there was a songless bird in the same direction, pecking at his cage, as if he were ticking too.
The rhythmical and, if I may so say, well-modulated undulation of the back in our ladies of Circular rank is envied and imitated by the wife of a common Equilateral, who can achieve nothing beyond a mere monotonous swing, like the ticking of a pendulum; and the regular tick of the Equilateral is no less admired and copied by the wife of the progressive and aspiring Isosceles, in the females of whose family no "back-motion" of any kind has become as yet a necessity of life.