tidal bore


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tidal bore

n.
A series of waves that propagate upstream in a narrowing estuary as the flood tide surges into the river mouth.

tidal bore

n
(Physical Geography) another term for bore3
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tidal bore - a high wave (often dangerous) caused by tidal flow (as by colliding tidal currents or in a narrow estuary)tidal bore - a high wave (often dangerous) caused by tidal flow (as by colliding tidal currents or in a narrow estuary)
tidal current, tidal flow - the water current caused by the tides
Translations
References in classic literature ?
In another moment a huge wave, like a muddy tidal bore but almost scaldingly hot, came sweeping round the bend upstream.
As well as eating, there are adventure sports to be tried, extraordinary natural phenomenon to watch (such as the tidal bore wave in the Bay of Fundy), and wildlife to be spotted everywhere, from whales and bald eagles to tiny crabs and sea anemones.
And we reported on the natural phenomenon, the River Mersey Tidal Bore, that was expected to hit.
Cadets got to experience riding the tidal bore and shooting the rapids in Zodiacs as the tide rushes up Nova Scotia's Shubenacadie River, past eagle nests, Acadian dykelands, a cantilever bridge, and geological formations.
The tidal bore on the east coast continues to experience problems, no deep-rock geothermal has yet been commissioned in Canada, and the country's first concentrated solar facility will start soon in Alberta.
There's something very magical and scary about the tidal bore when it comes in.
On the Severn in Gloucestershire, surfers rode a maximum level-5 tidal bore on Saturday.
Which British river is noted for its tidal bore, a wave that runs up-river at high tide?
The Kasanka bat migration in Zambia, Carlsbad Cavern in America, Lunar rainbow in Zambia and Shubenacadie tidal bore in Canada take the 16,17,18 and 19 spots.
The Moncton race will be staged at Tidal Bore Park.
Disasters are said to come in threes, but Bruce Parker makes it clear they've always come in waves, and frequently provoke ingenious responses: the fact that the first tide table was devised in China is down to the tidal bore in the Qiantang River--at more than three kilometres wide and seven metres high, it isn't surprising that local minds applied themselves to predicting its appearance.