tides


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Related to tides: neap tides, spring tides

tide 1

 (tīd)
n.
1.
a. The periodic variation in the surface level of the oceans and of bays, gulfs, inlets, and estuaries, caused by gravitational attraction of the moon and sun.
b. A specific occurrence of such a variation: awaiting the next high tide.
c. Flood tide.
2. Tidal force.
3.
a. Something that increases, decreases, or fluctuates like the waters of the tide: a rising tide of skepticism; the shifting tide of the battle.
b. A large amount or number moving or occurring in a mass: an incoming tide of immigrants; a tide of angry letters.
c. A surge of emotion: felt an irresistible tide of sympathy for the defendant. See Synonyms at flow.
4. A time or season. Often used in combination: eventide; Christmastide; Shrovetide.
5. A favorable occasion; an opportunity.
v. tid·ed, tid·ing, tides
v.intr.
1. To rise and fall like the tide.
2. Nautical To drift or ride with the tide: tided off the reef; tiding up the Hudson.
v.tr.
To carry along with the tide.
Phrasal Verb:
tide over
To support through a difficult period: I asked for $100 to tide me over till payday.

[Middle English, from Old English tīd, division of time; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

tide 2

 (tīd)
intr.v. tid·ed, tid·ing, tides Archaic
To betide; befall.

[Middle English tiden, from Old English tīdan; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

tides

  • river estuary - The mouth of a river that is influenced by the tides.
  • ebb - Suggests the receding of something (e.g. tides) that commonly comes and goes.
  • riptide - Is actually a current, not a tide.
  • canonical hours - The seven canonical hours of the church were called tides, and tide—from an Indo-European root meaning "to divide"—is used with other words to denote a definite interval of time: noontide, Eastertide, eventide, summertide, etc.

tides

The regular rise and fall of sea level mainly due to the Moon’s gravitational pull on the Earth.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The tides sweep through Carquinez Straits as in a mill-race, and the full ebb was on when I stumbled overboard.
Been a knocking about with a pretty many tides, ain't he pardner?
The tides of Pellucidar don't amount to much by comparison with our higher tides of the outer world, but I knew that it ought to prove ample to float the Sari.
We had run aground, and in one of those seas where the tides are middling--a sorry matter for the floating of the Nautilus.
They who have turned their attention to the affairs of men, must have perceived that there are tides in them; tides very irregular in their duration, strength, and direction, and seldom found to run twice exactly in the same manner or measure.
All I can tell you is that it stands just out of reach of the full tides, on a piece of rock, dead on the beach and about a mile from the station.
The tide, beginning to run down at nine, and being with us until three, we intended still to creep on after it had turned, and row against it until dark.
If D'Artagnan had been a poet, it was a beautiful spectacle: the immense strand of a league or more, the sea covers at high tide, and which, at the reflux, appears gray and desolate, strewed with polypi and seaweed, with pebbles sparse and white, like bones in some vast old cemetery.
And, it being low water, he went out with the tide.
Charley pondered a moment, and then answered, "The tide has edged us over a bit out of our course, but if the fog lifts right now, as it is going to lift, you'll find we're not more than a thousand miles off McNear's Landing.
But that which surprised me most was, that the ship was lifted off in the night from the sand where she lay by the swelling of the tide, and was driven up almost as far as the rock which I at first mentioned, where I had been so bruised by the wave dashing me against it.
It's like the tide, Jo, when it turns, it goes slowly, but it can't be stopped.