tier


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tier 1

 (tîr)
n.
1. One of a series of rows placed one above another: a stadium with four tiers of seats.
2. A rank or class.
tr. & intr.v. tiered, tier·ing, tiers
To arrange (something) into or rise in tiers: tier a wedding cake; balconies that tier upward.

[Middle English tire, row, rank, from Old French, from tirer, to draw out; see tirade.]

ti·er 2

 (tī′ər)
n.
One that ties: a tier of knots.

tier

(tɪə)
n
1. one of a set of rows placed one above and behind the other, such as theatre seats
2.
a. a layer or level
b. (in combination): a three-tier cake.
3. a rank, order, or row
vb
to be or arrange in tiers
[C16: from Old French tire rank, of Germanic origin; compare Old English tīr embellishment]

tier

(ˈtaɪə)
n
a person or thing that ties

tier1

(tɪər)

n.
1. one of a series of rows or ranks rising one behind or above another, as of seats in an amphitheater.
2. one of a number of galleries, as in a theater.
3. a layer; level; stratum: a wedding cake with six tiers.
v.t.
4. to arrange in tiers.
v.i.
5. to rise in tiers.
[1560–70; earlier also tire, tyre, teare < Middle French, Old French tire, tiere order, row, rank < Germanic; compare Old English, Old Saxon tīr, Old High German zēri glory, adornment]

ti•er2

(ˈtaɪ ər)

n.
a person or thing that ties.
[1625–35]

tier

- From French tire, "order, sequence."
See also related terms for sequence.

Tier

 a row or rank; a series; ships moored or at anchor, 1732.
Examples: tier of galleries; of guns; of organ pipes; of shelves; of shipping (moored), 1858; of snakes, 1646; of theatre boxes; the lower tier of society, 1882.

tier


Past participle: tiered
Gerund: tiering

Imperative
tier
tier
Present
I tier
you tier
he/she/it tiers
we tier
you tier
they tier
Preterite
I tiered
you tiered
he/she/it tiered
we tiered
you tiered
they tiered
Present Continuous
I am tiering
you are tiering
he/she/it is tiering
we are tiering
you are tiering
they are tiering
Present Perfect
I have tiered
you have tiered
he/she/it has tiered
we have tiered
you have tiered
they have tiered
Past Continuous
I was tiering
you were tiering
he/she/it was tiering
we were tiering
you were tiering
they were tiering
Past Perfect
I had tiered
you had tiered
he/she/it had tiered
we had tiered
you had tiered
they had tiered
Future
I will tier
you will tier
he/she/it will tier
we will tier
you will tier
they will tier
Future Perfect
I will have tiered
you will have tiered
he/she/it will have tiered
we will have tiered
you will have tiered
they will have tiered
Future Continuous
I will be tiering
you will be tiering
he/she/it will be tiering
we will be tiering
you will be tiering
they will be tiering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tiering
you have been tiering
he/she/it has been tiering
we have been tiering
you have been tiering
they have been tiering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tiering
you will have been tiering
he/she/it will have been tiering
we will have been tiering
you will have been tiering
they will have been tiering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tiering
you had been tiering
he/she/it had been tiering
we had been tiering
you had been tiering
they had been tiering
Conditional
I would tier
you would tier
he/she/it would tier
we would tier
you would tier
they would tier
Past Conditional
I would have tiered
you would have tiered
he/she/it would have tiered
we would have tiered
you would have tiered
they would have tiered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tier - a relative position or degree of value in a graded grouptier - a relative position or degree of value in a graded group; "lumber of the highest grade"
biosafety level - the level of safety from exposure to infectious agents; depends on work practices and safety equipment and facilities
rank - relative status; "his salary was determined by his rank and seniority"
A level - the advanced level of a subject taken in school (usually two years after O level)
GCSE, General Certificate of Secondary Education, O level - the basic level of a subject taken in school
college level - the level of education that college students are assumed to have attained
2.tier - any one of two or more competitors who tie one another
challenger, competitor, contender, rival, competition - the contestant you hope to defeat; "he had respect for his rivals"; "he wanted to know what the competition was doing"
3.tier - a worker who ties something
worker - a person who works at a specific occupation; "he is a good worker"
4.tier - something that is used for tying; "the sail is fastened to the yard with tiers"
rope - a strong line
5.tier - one of two or more layers one atop another; "tier upon tier of huge casks"; "a three-tier wedding cake"
layer, bed - single thickness of usually some homogeneous substance; "slices of hard-boiled egg on a bed of spinach"

tier

noun row, bank, layer, line, order, level, series, file, rank, storey, stratum, echelon an auditorium with tiers of seats around and above it

tier

noun
1. A group of people or things arranged in a row:
2. A division of persons or things by quality, rank, or grade:
Translations
صَف مَقاعِد مُدَرَّج
řada
række
sætaröî
rinda

tier

[tɪəʳ] N
1. (in stadium, amphitheatre) (= row of seats) → grada f; [of cake] → piso m
to arrange in tiersdisponer en gradas or pisos
2. (fig) (in management, system) → nivel m
a two-tier health serviceun sistema sanitario que hace distinciones entre dos grupos

tier

[ˈtɪər] n
[seats] → gradin m
We were sitting in the top tier → Nous étions assis dans le gradin du haut.
tier of seats → gradin m
[cake] → étage m

tier

n (of cake)Etage f, → Stufe f; (of amphitheatre)Reihe f; (Theat, of stadium) → Rang m; (fig, in hierarchy etc) → Stufe f, → Rang m; a cake with three tiersein dreistöckiger Kuchen; a three-tier hierarchyeine dreigestufte Hierarchie; to arrange something in tiersetw stufenförmig aufbauen

tier

[tɪəʳ] n (in theatre) → fila; (in stadium) → gradinata; (layer) → strato; (of cake) → piano
to arrange in tiers → disporre in file (or in strati)

tier

(tiə) noun
a row of seats. They sat in the front/first tier.
References in classic literature ?
While most of them stood by with bows and arrows, ready to shoot any of the Folk that exposed themselves, several of the Fire-Men heaped the dry grass and wood at the mouths of the lower tier of caves.
I had scarcely laid the first tier of the masonry when I discovered that the intoxication of Fortunato had in a great measure worn off.
He stretched forth a hand and lovingly caressed a golden ingot on the nearest tier.
Firmin Richard told his secretary to send Box Five on the grand tier to Mm.
Around three sides of the Field were erected tier upon tier of seats, for the spectators, with the royal boxes and booths for the nobility and gentry in the center.
In the centre of a lofty area, lighted by windows in the four walls, are five tiers of cells, one above the other; each tier having before it a light iron gallery, attainable by stairs of the same construction and material: excepting the lower one, which is on the ground.
1846; The Red Skins, 1846; The Crater (Marks Reef), 1847; Captain Spike, or the Islets of the Gulf, 1848; Jack Tier, or the Florida Reefs, 1848; The Oak Openings, or the Bee-Hunter, 1848; The Sea Lions,
Beyond is the cemetery--long, winding galleries hewn out of the solid rock, with recesses on either hand, wherein, tier above tier, lie the revolutionists just as they were laid away by their comrades long years agone.
For on the topmost tier of the hotel verandah, after being carried up the steps in an armchair amid a bevy of footmen, maid-servants, and other menials of the hotel, headed by the landlord (that functionary had actually run out to meet a visitor who arrived with so much stir and din, attended by her own retinue, and accompanied by so great a pile of trunks and portmanteaux)--on the topmost tier of the verandah, I say, there was sitting--THE GRANDMOTHER
The mountains bar the course of the river, which forms a little lake at their feet, and raise their crests above it, tier on tier.
cried Mother, breaking out again, "when I saw all those children ranged tier above tier, and appealing from the father none of them has ever known on earth, to the great Father of us all in Heaven, I thought, does any wretched mother ever come here, and look among those young faces, wondering which is the poor child she brought into this forlorn world, never through all its life to know her love, her kiss, her face, her voice, even her name
It was true; all the six tiers were filled, and remained so to the end--which suggested that it is not only balcony people who like Shakespeare in Germany, but those of the pit and gallery, too.