tercel

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ter·cel

 (tûr′səl) also tier·cel (tîr′səl)
n.
A male falcon or hawk, especially a peregrine falcon or gyrfalcon.

[Middle English, from Old French terçuel, from Vulgar Latin *tertiōlus, diminutive of Latin tertius, third (perhaps because the third egg in every clutch was thought to hatch into a male, or because male hawks were said to be a third smaller than females); see trei- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tercel

(ˈtɜːsəl) or

tiercel

n
(Falconry) a male falcon or hawk, esp as used in falconry
[C14: from Old French, from Vulgar Latin tertiolus (unattested), from Latin tertius third, referring to the tradition that only one egg in three hatched a male chick]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ter•cel

(ˈtɜr səl)

also terce•let

(ˈtɜrs lɪt)

tiercel



n.
the male of a hawk, esp. of a gyrfalcon or peregrine.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French terçuel < Vulgar Latin *tertiolus= Latin terti(us) third + -olus -ole1; probably so called because the male is about one third smaller than the female]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tercel - male hawk especially male peregrine or gyrfalcontercel - male hawk especially male peregrine or gyrfalcon
hawk - diurnal bird of prey typically having short rounded wings and a long tail
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among birds of prey, females are one-third larger than males, and falconers traditionally employ hens rather than tiercels in their sport.
When Sir Arthur Throckmorton gave away a goshawk, he noted the gift in his diary.(40) In 1631, Richard Boyle was presented with a pair of peregrines by Tirlagh O'Boyle and a pair of goshawks by John McNemarro; the two tiercels were damaged `in the bringing', but the female peregrine was sent to the countess of Leicester and the female goshawk to the earl of Dorset.(41) Help in the recovery of lost hawks was regarded as a personal favour.(42)
Among birds of prey, females are about one-third larger than males, and falconers traditionally employ hens rather than tiercels in their sport.