tier

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tier

row, rank, or layer, one atop the other: Their seats are on the third tier.
Not to be confused with:
tear – (tear as in teardrop) a drop of the saline solution that is secreted by the lacrimal glands: I won’t shed a tear if you go.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

tier 1

 (tîr)
n.
1. One of a series of rows placed one above another: a stadium with four tiers of seats.
2. A rank or class.
tr. & intr.v. tiered, tier·ing, tiers
To arrange (something) into or rise in tiers: tier a wedding cake; balconies that tier upward.

[Middle English tire, row, rank, from Old French, from tirer, to draw out; see tirade.]

ti·er 2

 (tī′ər)
n.
One that ties: a tier of knots.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tier

(tɪə)
n
1. one of a set of rows placed one above and behind the other, such as theatre seats
2.
a. a layer or level
b. (in combination): a three-tier cake.
3. a rank, order, or row
vb
to be or arrange in tiers
[C16: from Old French tire rank, of Germanic origin; compare Old English tīr embellishment]

tier

(ˈtaɪə)
n
a person or thing that ties
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tier1

(tɪər)

n.
1. one of a series of rows or ranks rising one behind or above another, as of seats in an amphitheater.
2. one of a number of galleries, as in a theater.
3. a layer; level; stratum: a wedding cake with six tiers.
v.t.
4. to arrange in tiers.
v.i.
5. to rise in tiers.
[1560–70; earlier also tire, tyre, teare < Middle French, Old French tire, tiere order, row, rank < Germanic; compare Old English, Old Saxon tīr, Old High German zēri glory, adornment]

ti•er2

(ˈtaɪ ər)

n.
a person or thing that ties.
[1625–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tier

- From French tire, "order, sequence."
See also related terms for sequence.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Tier

 a row or rank; a series; ships moored or at anchor, 1732.
Examples: tier of galleries; of guns; of organ pipes; of shelves; of shipping (moored), 1858; of snakes, 1646; of theatre boxes; the lower tier of society, 1882.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

tier


Past participle: tiered
Gerund: tiering

Imperative
tier
tier
Present
I tier
you tier
he/she/it tiers
we tier
you tier
they tier
Preterite
I tiered
you tiered
he/she/it tiered
we tiered
you tiered
they tiered
Present Continuous
I am tiering
you are tiering
he/she/it is tiering
we are tiering
you are tiering
they are tiering
Present Perfect
I have tiered
you have tiered
he/she/it has tiered
we have tiered
you have tiered
they have tiered
Past Continuous
I was tiering
you were tiering
he/she/it was tiering
we were tiering
you were tiering
they were tiering
Past Perfect
I had tiered
you had tiered
he/she/it had tiered
we had tiered
you had tiered
they had tiered
Future
I will tier
you will tier
he/she/it will tier
we will tier
you will tier
they will tier
Future Perfect
I will have tiered
you will have tiered
he/she/it will have tiered
we will have tiered
you will have tiered
they will have tiered
Future Continuous
I will be tiering
you will be tiering
he/she/it will be tiering
we will be tiering
you will be tiering
they will be tiering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tiering
you have been tiering
he/she/it has been tiering
we have been tiering
you have been tiering
they have been tiering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tiering
you will have been tiering
he/she/it will have been tiering
we will have been tiering
you will have been tiering
they will have been tiering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tiering
you had been tiering
he/she/it had been tiering
we had been tiering
you had been tiering
they had been tiering
Conditional
I would tier
you would tier
he/she/it would tier
we would tier
you would tier
they would tier
Past Conditional
I would have tiered
you would have tiered
he/she/it would have tiered
we would have tiered
you would have tiered
they would have tiered
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tier - a relative position or degree of value in a graded grouptier - a relative position or degree of value in a graded group; "lumber of the highest grade"
biosafety level - the level of safety from exposure to infectious agents; depends on work practices and safety equipment and facilities
rank - relative status; "his salary was determined by his rank and seniority"
A level - the advanced level of a subject taken in school (usually two years after O level)
GCSE, General Certificate of Secondary Education, O level - the basic level of a subject taken in school
college level - the level of education that college students are assumed to have attained
2.tier - any one of two or more competitors who tie one another
challenger, competitor, contender, rival, competition - the contestant you hope to defeat; "he had respect for his rivals"; "he wanted to know what the competition was doing"
3.tier - a worker who ties something
worker - a person who works at a specific occupation; "he is a good worker"
4.tier - something that is used for tying; "the sail is fastened to the yard with tiers"
rope - a strong line
5.tier - one of two or more layers one atop another; "tier upon tier of huge casks"; "a three-tier wedding cake"
layer, bed - single thickness of usually some homogeneous substance; "slices of hard-boiled egg on a bed of spinach"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

tier

noun row, bank, layer, line, order, level, series, file, rank, storey, stratum, echelon an auditorium with tiers of seats around and above it
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

tier

noun
1. A group of people or things arranged in a row:
2. A division of persons or things by quality, rank, or grade:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
صَف مَقاعِد مُدَرَّج
řada
række
sætaröî
rinda

tier

[tɪəʳ] N
1. (in stadium, amphitheatre) (= row of seats) → grada f; [of cake] → piso m
to arrange in tiersdisponer en gradas or pisos
2. (fig) (in management, system) → nivel m
a two-tier health serviceun sistema sanitario que hace distinciones entre dos grupos
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tier

[ˈtɪər] n
[seats] → gradin m
We were sitting in the top tier → Nous étions assis dans le gradin du haut.
tier of seats → gradin m
[cake] → étage m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tier

n (of cake)Etage f, → Stufe f; (of amphitheatre)Reihe f; (Theat, of stadium) → Rang m; (fig, in hierarchy etc) → Stufe f, → Rang m; a cake with three tiersein dreistöckiger Kuchen; a three-tier hierarchyeine dreigestufte Hierarchie; to arrange something in tiersetw stufenförmig aufbauen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tier

[tɪəʳ] n (in theatre) → fila; (in stadium) → gradinata; (layer) → strato; (of cake) → piano
to arrange in tiers → disporre in file (or in strati)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

tier

(tiə) noun
a row of seats. They sat in the front/first tier.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
It was about this time that the upper tiers seemed to empty themselves spontaneously.
It was true; all the six tiers were filled, and remained so to the end--which suggested that it is not only balcony people who like Shakespeare in Germany, but those of the pit and gallery, too.
This and much more passed through Tarzan's memory as he stood gazing at the long tiers of dull-yellow metal.
The uprising tiers of seats filled early, upon this summer morning, and the merry chatter of the people went abroad like the hum of bees in a hive.
In the centre of a lofty area, lighted by windows in the four walls, are five tiers of cells, one above the other; each tier having before it a light iron gallery, attainable by stairs of the same construction and material: excepting the lower one, which is on the ground.
I observed that the upper and lower tiers of wings were connected by a strong chain.
Natasha, smoothing her gown, went in with Sonya and sat down, scanning the brilliant tiers of boxes opposite.
Benches surrounded this open space upon three sides, and along the fourth were heaped huge bowlders which rose in receding tiers toward the roof.
Until now, the boat had barely held her own, and had hovered about one spot; but now, the banks changed swiftly, and the deepening shadows and the kindling lights of London Bridge were passed, and the tiers of shipping lay on either hand.
Old London Bridge was soon passed, and old Billingsgate market with its oyster-boats and Dutchmen, and the White Tower and Traitor's Gate, and we were in among the tiers of shipping.
Here, in long tiers, with alleyways between, the water-casks were chocked safely on their sides.
The houses on the opposite side of the ditch had been entered by the mob; sashes were thrown up, or torn bodily out; there were tiers and tiers of faces in every window; cluster upon cluster of people clinging to every house-top.