tightrope


Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

tight·rope

 (tīt′rōp′)
n.
1. A tightly stretched rope or a wire, on which acrobats perform high above the ground.
2. An extremely precarious course or situation.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tightrope

(ˈtaɪtˌrəʊp)
n
1. a rope or cable stretched taut above the ground on which acrobats walk or perform balancing feats
2. to be in a difficult situation that demands careful and considered behaviour
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tight•rope

(ˈtaɪtˌroʊp)

n.
1. a rope or wire cable, stretched tight, on which acrobats perform feats of balancing.
2. a risky or delicate situation.
[1795–1805]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tightrope - tightly stretched rope or wire on which acrobats perform high above the groundtightrope - tightly stretched rope or wire on which acrobats perform high above the ground
high wire - a tightrope very high above the ground
rope - a strong line
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
حَبل البَهْلَوان
visuté lano
line
kifeszített kötél
lína
vrv
cambaz ipi

tightrope

[ˈtaɪtrəʊp]
A. Ncuerda f floja
to be on a tightrope; be walking a tightropeandar en la cuerda floja
B. CPD tightrope walker Nequilibrista mf, funámbulo/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tightrope

[ˈtaɪtrəʊp] ncorde f raide
to be walking a tightrope (= in difficult situation) → être sur la corde raidetight-rope walker nfunambule mf
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tightrope

nSeil nt; to walk a tightrope (fig)einen Balanceakt vollführen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tightrope

[ˈtaɪtˌrəʊp] ncorda (da acrobata)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

tight

(tait) adjective
1. fitting very or too closely. I couldn't open the box because the lid was too tight; My trousers are too tight.
2. stretched to a great extent; not loose. He made sure that the ropes were tight.
3. (of control etc) strict and very careful. She keeps (a) tight control over her emotions.
4. not allowing much time. We hope to finish this next week but the schedule's a bit tight.
adverb
(also ˈtightly) closely; with no extra room or space. The bags were packed tight / tightly packed.
-tight sealed so as to keep (something) in or out, as in airtight, *watertight
ˈtighten verb
to make or become tight or tighter.
ˈtightness noun
tights noun plural
a close-fitting (usually nylon or woollen) garment covering the feet, legs and body to the waist. She bought three pairs of tights.
ˌtight-ˈfisted adjective
mean and ungenerous with money. a tight-fisted employer.
ˈtightrope noun
a tightly-stretched rope or wire on which acrobats balance.
a tight corner/spot
a difficult position or situation. His refusal to help put her in a tight corner/spot.
tighten one's belt
to make sacrifices and reduce one's standard of living. If the economy gets worse, we shall just have to tighten our belts.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
From one lofty branch the agile creature swung with Clayton through a dizzy arc to a neighboring tree; then for a hundred yards maybe the sure feet threaded a maze of interwoven limbs, balancing like a tightrope walker high above the black depths of verdure beneath.
The famous Blondin was going to perform on a tightrope in another part of the garden.
Thee wath Tightrope, thee wath, and now thee'th nothing - on accounth of fat.
The Walk, a movie about Philippe Petit's 1974 tightrope walk between New York's Twin Towers, doesn't make for comfortable viewing for those who have a fear of heights.
Cartographer's Skin (Piquant Press) and Tourist (Tightrope Books).
The Colombian is walking a tightrope following his yellow card for simulation in the 1-1 draw at Pittodrie last Sunday and now finds himself a booking away from missing a potential Old Firm semi-final showdown at Hampden.
DRESSED in a red and silver sequined jacket and trousers, 13- year-old Muhamed Balikhanov holds a long pole as he slowly rides an old red bicycle along a tightrope suspended several metres off the ground.
SPECTACULAR TIGHTROPE WALK The audience holds its breath as Chris Bullzini, also pictured right preparing for the event, crosses the wire at the Piece Hall, Halifax MORE than 2,000 people held their breath and gasped in awe as history was recreated in a spectacular tightrope walk at Halifax's Piece Hall.
The performer has earned several Guinness World Records, including the fastest backwards walk on a 100 meter (328 feet) tightrope and being the first person ever to walk backwards blindfolded on a tightrope between two hot air balloons.
Performer Sergey Marakov fell onto a hard wooden floor when his tightrope suddenly loosened - but was miraculously almost uninjured and staggered to his feet, taking a bow, clutching his arm.
From its opening "Revelation" to its closing "Vows," Threshold takes the measure of masculinity, femininity, and the tightrope in between, packing its pages with hidden significance.
Two former Tightrope Media Systems executives responsible for much of the success of a popular tech tool have taken ownership of it.