tikoloshe


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tikoloshe

(ˌtɪkɒˈlɒʃ; -ˈlɒʃɪ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) a variant of tokoloshe
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Elaborating further on the metaphysical potential of cattle, the act of killing monsters and tikoloshe (dwarf-like creatures described as 'witches' familiars') caused cattle to erupt from their wounds, becoming the property of their killers and in some cases empowering them to become chiefs (Casalis 1861: 339-43; Jacottet 1908: 58-60, 72-3, 76-7).
Scholars of African literature have drawn attention to how tikoloshe and other supernatural figures describe relations of being in African narrative forms.
"The Tikoloshe and the Reasonable Man: Transgressing South African Legal Fictions." Law and Literature 16 (2004): 353-374.
The tokoloshe (or tikoloshe or tikoloshi) in African mythology is a humanoid creature about 1 m tall, with a large head, big eyes and a slender torso.
Uit sy bakermat uit [die Transkei] het die Bantoe Tikoloshe die volksgeloof van die blankes binnegedring onder die naam Tokkelossie.
In sommige van die verhale is die Tokkelossie 'n kannibaal wat stoute kinders eet en baie hoog kan spring, selfs met 'n kind onder die een arm (sien bespreking van die "Tikoloshe" op Wikipedia).
Latter claims he was killing a tikoloshe (evil goblin), not a human baby, and Scan, pitted against a modernist prosecuting lawyer (Vusi Kunene) and old-style English judge (Nigel Hawthorne), seeks to prove that the homicide was justifiable because it was done in true faith.