tiktaalik


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tiktaalik

(ˌtɪkˈtɑːlɪk)
n
(Animals) an extinct species, Tiktaalik rosae, that is believed to be the missing link between water and land animals
[C21: from Inuktitut: burbot]
References in periodicals archive ?
You'll also be witness to a two-headed cow, a prehistoric fish called Tiktaalik, and a tyrannosaurus rex.
The same group of researchers, who discovered Tiktaalik roseae, the important transitional animal considered "a missing link" between fish and the earliest limbed animals, discovered the 375-million-year-old beast.
A recent discovery in the Canadian Arctic, however, has placed the fossil fish Tiktaalik as the closest cousin to land animals.
We" refers to our fishy forebear, who bears the name Tiktaalik.
The transition from fishes to limbed vertebrates, or tetrapods, occurred about 370,000,000 years ago, when the "missing link" Tiktaalik Roseae, better known as the "fishapod," first emerged from the ancient, fertile seas of our Earth.
Your Inner Fish seeks to reveal the evolutionary history of humans as we travel down the branches of our family tree toward its trunk, passing fossils such as Tiktaalik and finding our "inner fish" along the way.
For example, in 2006, Neil Shubin and colleagues published two papers in Nature (8), (9) detailing their amazing find in arctic Canada: a fossil, Tiktaalik rosaea, that is an almost perfect intermediary between fish and reptiles.
Neil Shubin, Professor of Biology and Anatomy at the University of Chicago, made headlines in April 2006 with his discovery of a 375-million-year-old fossil called Tiktaalik, the missing link between ancient sea creatures and land dwellers.
Composed of features that are part fish and part amphibian, Tiktaalik was held up as an important "missing link" in terrestrial vertebrate evolution.
On the other hand, to convey its meaning, the Darwin fish requires a name and the understanding that it bears a stylized resemblance to Tiktaalik, which is a transitional fossil between fish and amphibian.
3) Lastly, the head of Tiktaalik is described as crocodile-like.
Se trata de un pez anfibio que vivio hace unos 375 millones de anos en lo que hoy es la isla canadiense de Ellsmere; bautizado por los cientificos como Tiktaalik roseae, media entre 1.