tilled


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till 1

 (tĭl)
tr.v. tilled, till·ing, tills
To prepare (land) for the raising of crops, as by plowing and harrowing; cultivate.

[Middle English tillen, from Old English tilian.]

till′a·ble adj.

till 2

 (tĭl)
prep.
Until.
conj.
Until.

[Middle English, from Old English til, from Old Norse.]
Usage Note: Till and until are generally interchangeable in both writing and speech, though as the first word in a sentence until is usually preferred: Until you get that paper written, don't even think about going to the movies. · Till is actually the older word, with until having been formed by the addition to it of the prefix un-, meaning "up to." In the 1700s, the spelling 'till became fashionable, as if till were a shortened form of until. Although 'till is now nonstandard, 'til is sometimes used in this way and is considered acceptable, though it is etymologically incorrect.

till 3

 (tĭl)
n.
1. A drawer, small chest, or compartment for money, as in a store.
2. A supply of money; a purse.

[Middle English tille.]

till 4

 (tĭl)
n.
Glacial drift composed of an unconsolidated, heterogeneous mixture of clay, sand, pebbles, cobbles, and boulders.

[Origin unknown.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tilled - turned or stirred by plowing or harrowing or hoeing; "tilled land ready for seed"
ploughed, plowed - (of farmland) broken and turned over with a plow; "plowed fields"
References in periodicals archive ?
In this technique only the crop rows where seeds will be planted are tilled.
The more uniform snow distribution under no-till was particularly apparent for ridge tops and steep south-facing slopes where there was typically 4 to 8 inches more snow than on conventionally tilled fields.
They are useful in catching runoff from tilled slopes and slowing the water so that most of the eroding topsoil settles out.
At Pendleton, Williams, Long, and soil scientists Hero Gollany and Stewart Wuest compared runoff, soil erosion, and crop yields in a conventional, intensively tilled winter wheat-fallow system and a no-till 4-year cropping rotation system.