tiltyard


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

tilt·yard

 (tĭlt′yärd′)
n.
An enclosed yard for tilting contests.

tiltyard

(ˈtɪltˌjɑːd)
n
(Historical Terms) (formerly) an enclosed area for tilting
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tiltyard - (formerly) an enclosed field for tilting contests
yard - a tract of land enclosed for particular activities (sometimes paved and usually associated with buildings); "they opened a repair yard on the edge of town"
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
The eyes, therefore, of a very considerable multitude, were bent on the gate of the Preceptory of Templestowe, with the purpose of witnessing the procession; while still greater numbers had already surrounded the tiltyard belonging to that establishment.
This slow procession moved up the gentle eminence, on the summit of which was the tiltyard, and, entering the lists, marched once around them from right to left, and when they had completed the circle, made a halt.
a champion!'' And despite the prepossessions and prejudices of the multitude, they shouted unanimously as the knight rode into the tiltyard, The second glance, however, served to destroy the hope that his timely arrival had excited.
Medieval re-enactors also provide archery demonstrations and knights' tournaments in the Tiltyard of Bradgate House Ruins.
30 supercars will gather at the Tiltyard pub in Leyes Lane, Kenilworth for the annual extravaganza.
Entry to the museum is free but the tiltyard events are ticketed and should be booked: PS6.25 for children and PS10.50 for adults (family packages also available).
You can see a lot of it in action as knights joust in the tiltyard on selected dates.
41 The Royal Armouries Museum in Leeds houses 8,500 medieval pieces and you can see a lot of it in action as knights joust in the tiltyard on selected dates.
Tiltyard team member Barbara Smith talked with the Duchess about the garden's daffodils, then specifically about her own in Norfolk.
Historically, Horse Guards Parade was a site for spectacles both ceremonial and punitive: from 1644 to 1827, the former site of King Henry VIII's palace Tiltyard housed what was known to spectators as the "wooden horse," described as "wooden boards on edge which offenders were required to 'ride,' often with leg weights attached, for the period of their sentence" (Harwood 45-6).
For good measure, King James, Prince Charles, Prince Frederick, and other court figures participated in a tournament in the Whitehall tiltyard.
He provides a particularly revealing reading of the treatment of the three citizen wives, Mistresses Tiltyard, Gallipot and Openwork (pp.