timber right

(redirected from timber rights)

timber right

n. often timber rights
An interest in a property's timber that allows one to buy or sell the interest in the timber separately from the land.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pelkki said companies are paying less to private landowners for timber rights but that doesn't affect already-harvested wood.
Adams told investors they'd get returns of 12 percent to 13 percent for financing contracts to buy timber rights to be sold to lumber mills at a higher price, the U.S.
Timber harvesting rights are spelt in a contractual arrangement which is awarded through a competitive bidding process: "No person shall harvest timber from any land unless he holds timber rights in the form of a Timber Utilization Contract entered into in respect of the area of land concerned" (TRMA, Act 547: s1).
In addition to the plant, this included interests in hydroelectric facilities, water and surface rights, and timber rights, all of which the company planned to retain and work.
The corporation is a stepping stone in a much-needed overhaul of the province's wood supply system that allowed forestry companies to keep their timber rights and hoard wood even though their operations had been long since ceased.
The cutting of trees inside these concessions is expected since mining companies have timber rights under the Mining Act of 1995.
Those assets include timber rights, recreational real estate lands, and the potential for joint venture participations.
If voted to power, the front said it would ensure more power to the urban and rural local bodies, forest and timber rights and eradication of the menace of wild animals.
Pinhookers buy timber rights from trusting landowners at prices far below market value, then turn around and sell the rights for twice the price.
Three generations of the Bauman family have been stewards of just over a section of forest land in the Crow valley southwest of Eugene, starting early in 1941 when Henry Bauman, grandfather of the current owners, brothers Bob and Tom Bauman, bought an initial 554 acres of timber rights from then-owner George Gates for $9,000.
Soon after, the province seized the company's timber rights and hydro dams, provoking a high profile dispute and the threat of a NAFTA case against the province.
Specific examples of power and restructuring impacts in Newfoundland and Labrador are illustrated in chapters such as Sean Cadigan's "Restructuring the Woods: Timber Rights, Power and Agency in White Bay, Newfoundland, 1897-1959." Focusing on class and restructuring, Cadigan builds on Sinclair and Jane-Hodder's 2004 actor network theory.
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