timber right

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timber right

n. often timber rights
An interest in a property's timber that allows one to buy or sell the interest in the timber separately from the land.
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Timber harvesting rights are spelt in a contractual arrangement which is awarded through a competitive bidding process: "No person shall harvest timber from any land unless he holds timber rights in the form of a Timber Utilization Contract entered into in respect of the area of land concerned" (TRMA, Act 547: s1).
In addition to the plant, this included interests in hydroelectric facilities, water and surface rights, and timber rights, all of which the company planned to retain and work.
The corporation is a stepping stone in a much-needed overhaul of the province's wood supply system that allowed forestry companies to keep their timber rights and hoard wood even though their operations had been long since ceased.
The cutting of trees inside these concessions is expected since mining companies have timber rights under the Mining Act of 1995.
Those assets include timber rights, recreational real estate lands, and the potential for joint venture participations.
If voted to power, the front said it would ensure more power to the urban and rural local bodies, forest and timber rights and eradication of the menace of wild animals.
Pinhookers buy timber rights from trusting landowners at prices far below market value, then turn around and sell the rights for twice the price.
Three generations of the Bauman family have been stewards of just over a section of forest land in the Crow valley southwest of Eugene, starting early in 1941 when Henry Bauman, grandfather of the current owners, brothers Bob and Tom Bauman, bought an initial 554 acres of timber rights from then-owner George Gates for $9,000.
Soon after, the province seized the company's timber rights and hydro dams, provoking a high profile dispute and the threat of a NAFTA case against the province.
The chapter outlines how access to timber rights has gradually shifted from a community resource to private property and the effect this loss has had on occupational plurality.
The company, which paid $100,000 for the plant's use under a lease arrangement, valued the arrangement's timber rights and hydroelectric assets at $300 million (Canadian).
A recent decision by the Ontario Court of Appeal paves the way for Whitefish Lake First Nation to receive fair compensation for losses incurred when the First Nation surrendered timber rights to the Crown more than 120 years ago.
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