time limit

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time′ lim`it


n.
a period of time within which something must be done or completed.
[1875–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.time limit - a time period within which something must be done or completedtime limit - a time period within which something must be done or completed
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
limitation - (law) a time period after which suits cannot be brought; "statute of limitations"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
حَد أو تَحْديد زمني
časový limit
tidsgrænse
idõhatár
tímamörk
časový limit
mühletsüre tahdidivade

time limit

nzeitliche Begrenzung; (for the completion of a job) → Frist f; to put a time limit on somethingetw befristen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

time limit

nlimite m di tempo
to set a time limit → fissare un limite di tempo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

time

(taim) noun
1. the hour of the day. What time is it?; Can your child tell the time yet?
2. the passage of days, years, events etc. time and space; Time will tell.
3. a point at which, or period during which, something happens. at the time of his wedding; breakfast-time.
4. the quantity of minutes, hours, days etc, eg spent in, or available for, a particular activity etc. This won't take much time to do; I enjoyed the time I spent in Paris; At the end of the exam, the supervisor called `Your time is up!'
5. a suitable moment or period. Now is the time to ask him.
6. one of a number occasions. He's been to France four times.
7. a period characterized by a particular quality in a person's life, experience etc. He went through an unhappy time when she died; We had some good times together.
8. the speed at which a piece of music should be played; tempo. in slow time.
verb
1. to measure the time taken by (a happening, event etc) or by (a person, in doing something). He timed the journey.
2. to choose a particular time for. You timed your arrival beautifully!
ˈtimeless adjective
1. not belonging to, or typical of, any particular time. timeless works of art.
2. never-ending. the timeless beauty of Venice.
ˈtimelessly adverb
ˈtimelessness noun
ˈtimely adjective
coming at the right moment. Your arrival was most timely.
ˈtimeliness noun
ˈtimer noun
1. a person who, or a device which, measures the time taken by anything. a three-minute egg-timer.
2. a clock-like device which sets something off or switches something on or off at a given time.
times noun plural
1. a period; an era. We live in difficult times.
2. in mathematics, used to mean multiplied by. Four times two is eight.
ˈtiming noun
1. the measuring of the amount of time taken.
2. the regulating of speech or actions to achieve the best effect. All comedians should have a good sense of timing.
time bomb
a bomb that has been set to explode at a particular time.
ˈtime-consuming adjective
taking too much time to do. a time-consuming process/job.
time limit
a fixed length of time during which something must be done and finished. The examination has a time limit of three hours.
time ˈoff noun
a period of time away from work or studying.
time ˈout noun
(American).
1. (in basketball etc) a short break requested by the coach to give instructions etc.
2. a short period of rest from an activity. to take time out to relax.
ˈtimetable noun
a list of the times of trains, school classes etc.
all in good time
soon enough.
all the time
continually.
at times
occasionally; sometimes.
be behind time
to be late.
for the time being
meanwhile. I am staying at home for the time being.
from time to time
occasionally; sometimes. From time to time he brings me a present.
in good time
early enough; before a set time (for an appointment etc). We arrived in good time for the concert.
in time
1. early enough. He arrived in time for dinner; Are we in time to catch the train?
2. (with with) at the same speed or rhythm. They marched in time with the music.
no time (at all)
a very short time indeed. The journey took no time (at all).
one/two etc at a time
singly, or in groups of two etc. They came into the room three at a time.
on time
at the right time. The train left on time.
save/waste time
to avoid spending time; to spend time unnecessarily. Take my car instead of walking, if you want to save time; We mustn't waste time discussing unimportant matters.
take one's time
to do something as slowly as one wishes.
time and (time) again
again and again; repeatedly. I asked her time and (time) again not to do that.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Consequently, many shabby persons were wont to force their way in without paying, on the plea that they did not intend to remain beyond the time limited. Hence much noisy contention, to the great discomfort even of Royalty.
Then the time limited for his absence would be a week." Then, turning towards Athos: "Monsieur," said he, "your declaration is of the most serious importance; are you willing to repeat it under the seal of an oath?"
There were those who worked in the chilling rooms, and whose special disease was rheumatism; the time limit that a man could work in the chilling rooms was said to be five years.
With the ever-increasing number of docket filings, it is becoming more common for courts to impose time limits during trial.
Time limits on benefit receipt became a central feature of federal welfare policy in the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA).
A THE time limit depends on the country in question - in your case Italy, which will have its own regulations about time limits.
TIME LIMITS FOR TAKING CASES TO EMPLOYMENT TRIBUNALS
The 1990 Embryology Act changed the time limit for able-bodied abortion to 24 weeks but removed all time limits for abortion for disability.
The BMA has not debated abortion time limits since 1989.
Office of Special Counsel has not been consistently processing cases within statutory time limits, creating backlogs.
Seven countries have officially sought, as Article 55 of the Act of Accession permits them, to benefit from extended time limits, a demand which they justify by the "recycling infrastructure deficit, low population density and low level of consumption of electrical and electronic equipment and, for some of the countries, geographic circumstances, such as the presence of rural areas".