timidity


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tim·id

 (tĭm′ĭd)
adj. tim·id·er, tim·id·est
1. Lacking self-confidence; shy.
2. Fearful and hesitant: problems that call for bold, not timid, responses.

[Latin timidus, from timēre, to fear.]

ti·mid′i·ty, tim′id·ness n.
tim′id·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.timidity - fear of the unknown or unfamiliar or fear of making decisions
fear, fearfulness, fright - an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)
cold feet - timidity that prevents the continuation of a course of action; "I was going to tell him but I got cold feet"
shyness - a feeling of fear of embarrassment
diffidence, self-distrust, self-doubt - lack of self-confidence
2.timidity - fearfulness in venturing into new and unknown places or activities
faintheartedness, faintness - the trait of lacking boldness and courage; "faintness of heart and infirmity of purpose"
fearfulness - the trait of being afraid
boldness, hardihood, hardiness, daring - the trait of being willing to undertake things that involve risk or danger; "the proposal required great boldness"; "the plan required great hardiness of heart"

timidity

noun
1. An awkwardness or lack of self-confidence in the presence of others:
Translations
جُبْن، خَوْف
plachost
frygtsomhed
feimni; hugleysi
plachosť
çekingenlikürkeklik

timidity

[tɪˈmɪdɪtɪ] Ntimidez f

timidity

[tɪˈmɪdəti] ntimidité f

timidity

nScheu f, → Ängstlichkeit f; (of person, behaviour, words also)Schüchternheit f, → Zaghaftigkeit f; (of measure)Zaghaftigkeit f

timidity

[tɪˈmɪdɪtɪ] ntimidezza

timid

(ˈtimid) adjective
easily frightened; nervous; shy. A mouse is a timid creature.
ˈtimidly adverb
tiˈmidity noun
ˈtimidness noun
References in classic literature ?
Her mother leaves her more to herself than she did, and I have her with me as much as possible, and have taken great pains to overcome her timidity.
Grose only as an effect of our consideration for my inevitable strangeness and her natural timidity.
She was in a corner, and turning out her slender feet in their high boots with obvious timidity, she skated towards him.
Hiding order beneath the cloak of disorder is simply a question of subdivision; concealing courage under a show of timidity presupposes a fund of latent energy; masking strength with weakness is to be effected by tactical dispositions.
In my timidity I wandered up and down the street while I screwed up my courage to ring the bell; and then, sick with apprehension, was ushered into an airless room full of people.
He who does otherwise, either from timidity or evil advice, is always compelled to keep the knife in his hand; neither can he rely on his subjects, nor can they attach themselves to him, owing to their continued and repeated wrongs.
It is certain they have been, and shall be again, disregarded from timidity, from blindness, through infirmity of purpose.
The generosity of Sophia's temper construed this behaviour of Jones into great bravery; and it made a deep impression on her heart: for certain it is, that there is no one quality which so generally recommends men to women as this; proceeding, if we believe the common opinion, from that natural timidity of the sex, which is, says Mr Osborne, "so great, that a woman is the most cowardly of all the creatures God ever made;"--a sentiment more remarkable for its bluntness than for its truth.
Her gathering anxieties got the better of her discretion, and even of her timidity.
Although he was capable of expressing the highest feeling, a casing of timidity destroyed all the graces of his youth, just as the ice of poverty kept him from daring to put forth all his powers.
Timidity, therefore, confined her observation of the appearances which we have described to stoles glances; but, as the stamping of feet was now becoming less frequent, and even the coughing, and other little preliminaries of a congregation settling themselves down into reverential attention, were ceasing, she felt emboldened to look around her.
He talked to her more, and, from all that she said, was convinced of her having an affectionate heart, and a strong desire of doing right; and he could perceive her to be farther entitled to attention by great sensibility of her situation, and great timidity.