timpana


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tym·pa·num

also tim·pa·num (tĭm′pə-nəm)
n. pl. tym·pa·na (-nə) or tym·pa·nums also tim·pa·na or tim·pa·nums
1.
a. Anatomy See middle ear.
b. See eardrum.
2. Zoology A membranous external auditory structure, as in certain insects.
3. Architecture
a. The ornamental recessed space or panel enclosed by the cornices of a triangular pediment.
b. A similar space between an arch and the lintel of a portal or window.
4. The diaphragm of a telephone.

[Medieval Latin, from Latin, drum, from Greek tumpanon.]

timpana

(timˈpɑːnə)
n
(Cookery) a traditional Maltese baked pasta and pastry dish
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Akarima literally means the one who beats the drum and according to Locke (2002) he plays the timpana drum also called the talking drum (see Figure.
As such, there is an Asante influence evident in the drum language through the instrumentation of the ensemble which includes an iron double-bell called dawoulei, the timpana large side-by-side drums referred to locally as "talking drums," and the usage of Asante proverbs and praise names played by the various drums and bells of the ensemble (Locke, 2002).
The timpana or the talking drum constitute a pair of drums, each of which is anchored on a pair of stand as shown in fig.
Asked a respondents if the Akarima sing when playing the timpana, he responded by saying no, the drum is talking why should I talk again.
Timpana (macaroni in a pastry case), ross il-forn (baked rice in a bolognese sauce) and hut biz-Zalza (local fish cooked withGozo's citadel in Malta capers and tomato sauce) are popular choices.
Two of the drums still have their original shields threaded onto the corpus; the two inscriptions are virtually the same and testify to the considerable age of the instruments: "Timpana .
Pasta is Malta's favorite food, especially timpana, a macaroni-filled pie, and spaghetti, often topped with rabbit--another Maltese favorite.