tingle


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tin·gle

 (tĭng′gəl)
v. tin·gled, tin·gling, tin·gles
v.intr.
1. To have the sensation of being tapped or poked lightly with many needles in a certain area of the body, often caused by the cold, a sharp slap, or excitement: tingled all over with joy.
2. To cause such a sensation: The scratchy fabric tingled.
v.tr.
To cause to tingle.
n.
A tingling sensation.

[Middle English tinglen, alteration of tinklen; see tinkle.]

tin′gler n.
tin′gly adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tingle

(ˈtɪŋɡəl)
vb
(usually intr) to feel or cause to feel a prickling, itching, or stinging sensation of the flesh, as from a cold plunge or electric shock
n
a sensation of tingling
[C14: perhaps a variant of tinkle]
ˈtingler n
ˈtingling adj
ˈtinglingly adv
ˈtingly adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tin•gle

(ˈtɪŋ gəl)

v. -gled, -gling,
n. v.i.
1. to have a sensation of slight prickles, stings, or tremors, as from cold.
2. to cause such a sensation.
n.
3. a tingling sensation.
4. the tingling action of cold, excitement, etc.
[1350–1400; Middle English; variant of tinkle]
tin′gler, n.
tin′gling•ly, adv.
tin′gly, adj. -gli•er, -gli•est.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tingle

- From Middle English, possibly a variant of tinkle, its original meaning was "response to a loud noise" and "response to hearing something shocking."
See also related terms for shocking.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

tingle


Past participle: tingled
Gerund: tingling

Imperative
tingle
tingle
Present
I tingle
you tingle
he/she/it tingles
we tingle
you tingle
they tingle
Preterite
I tingled
you tingled
he/she/it tingled
we tingled
you tingled
they tingled
Present Continuous
I am tingling
you are tingling
he/she/it is tingling
we are tingling
you are tingling
they are tingling
Present Perfect
I have tingled
you have tingled
he/she/it has tingled
we have tingled
you have tingled
they have tingled
Past Continuous
I was tingling
you were tingling
he/she/it was tingling
we were tingling
you were tingling
they were tingling
Past Perfect
I had tingled
you had tingled
he/she/it had tingled
we had tingled
you had tingled
they had tingled
Future
I will tingle
you will tingle
he/she/it will tingle
we will tingle
you will tingle
they will tingle
Future Perfect
I will have tingled
you will have tingled
he/she/it will have tingled
we will have tingled
you will have tingled
they will have tingled
Future Continuous
I will be tingling
you will be tingling
he/she/it will be tingling
we will be tingling
you will be tingling
they will be tingling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tingling
you have been tingling
he/she/it has been tingling
we have been tingling
you have been tingling
they have been tingling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tingling
you will have been tingling
he/she/it will have been tingling
we will have been tingling
you will have been tingling
they will have been tingling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tingling
you had been tingling
he/she/it had been tingling
we had been tingling
you had been tingling
they had been tingling
Conditional
I would tingle
you would tingle
he/she/it would tingle
we would tingle
you would tingle
they would tingle
Past Conditional
I would have tingled
you would have tingled
he/she/it would have tingled
we would have tingled
you would have tingled
they would have tingled
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tingle - an almost pleasurable sensation of frighttingle - an almost pleasurable sensation of fright; "a frisson of surprise shot through him"
fear, fearfulness, fright - an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)
2.tingle - a somatic sensation as from many tiny prickles
somaesthesia, somatesthesia, somatic sensation, somesthesia - the perception of tactual or proprioceptive or gut sensations; "he relied on somesthesia to warn him of pressure changes"
pins and needles - a sharp tingling sensation from lack of circulation
Verb1.tingle - cause a stinging or tingling sensation
itch - have or perceive an itch; "I'm itching--the air is so dry!"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

tingle

verb
1. prickle, sting, itch, tickle, have goose pimples The backs of her thighs tingled.
noun
1. prickling, stinging, itch, itching, tickle, tickling, pins and needles (informal) I felt a sudden tingle in my fingers.
2. thrill, quiver, shiver a sudden tingle of excitement
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
تَنْميل، نُخْريُنَمِّل، يَنْخُر
pálitštípáníštípat
prikkeprikken
bizsereg
erta, valda sviîa; stingasmástingir, sviîi, kláîi
dilgčiojimasdilgčioti
Aukstais vējš knieba vaigosdzelstīšanastingttirpšanatirpt
štípanie
karıncalanmakarıncalanmaksızlamasızlamak

tingle

[ˈtɪŋgl]
A. N [of skin] → hormigueo m; (= thrill) → estremecimiento m
B. VI [ears] → zumbar
her cheeks were tingling after a walk in the snowdespués de pasear por la nieve le ardían las mejillas
your skin will tingle a bit when you apply the creamte escocerá un poco la piel al aplicar la crema
to tingle with excitementestremecerse de emoción
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tingle

[ˈtɪŋgəl]
n
(= physical sensation) → picotement m
(= excitement) → frisson m
a tingle of excitement → un frisson d'excitation
vi
(= sting) → cuire
The backs of his thighs tingled → Le dos des cuisses lui cuisait.
(= feel excited) → frissonner
to tingle with excitement → frissonner d'excitation
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tingle

viprickeln, kribbeln (inf) (→ with vor +dat); (with blows) → leicht brennen (with von); to tingle with excitementvor Aufregung beben, ganz kribbelig sein (inf)
nPrickeln nt, → Kribbeln nt (inf); (from blows) → leichtes Brennen; she felt a tingle of excitementsie war ganz kribbelig (inf); a tingle of excitement ran up her spineihr lief (vor Aufregung) ein Schauer über den Rücken
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tingle

[ˈtɪŋgl]
1. n (of skin) → formicolio; (thrill) → fremito
2. vi (cheeks, skin, from cold) → pungere, pizzicare; (from bad circulation) → formicolare
a tingling sensation → un formicolio
to tingle with excitement → fremere dall'eccitazione
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

tingle

(ˈtiŋgl) verb
to feel a prickling sensation. The cold wind made my face tingle; My fingers were tingling with cold.
noun
this feeling.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

tin·gle

n. hormigueo, comezón, sensación de picazón.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tingle

vi hormiguear
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
This morning, at six o'clock, while I was getting breakfast, my tail suddenly began to tingle. At first I thought it was my rheumatism coming back.
This was charming, no doubt; but they shortly found out That the Captain they trusted so well Had only one notion for crossing the ocean, And that was to tingle his bell.
Above a square-domed forehead he saw a mop of brown hair, nut-brown, with a wave to it and hints of curls that were a delight to any woman, making hands tingle to stroke it and fingers tingle to pass caresses through it.
Then the skin of my throat began to tingle as one's flesh does when the hand that is to tickle it approaches nearer, nearer.
'I mean, godmother,' replied Miss Wren, sitting down beside the Jew, 'that the fox has caught a famous flogging, and that if his skin and bones are not tingling, aching, and smarting at this present instant, no fox did ever tingle, ache, and smart.' Therewith Miss Jenny related what had come to pass in the Albany, omitting the few grains of pepper.
When Kotick felt his skin tingle all over, Matkah told him he was learning the "feel of the water," and that tingly, prickly feelings meant bad weather coming, and he must swim hard and get away.
The causes of peripheral neuropathy and other reasons that feet or hands may tingle are explored here.
Tingle, class of 1983, below the triumphant slogan, "Celebrating the Journey!"
The firm said that it has appointed Hilda Tingle to the position.
Nicky Henderson's brilliant two-miler faces just three rivals in the Betfair Tingle Creek Chase (3.00, ITV4).
FAMOUS FIVE facts about Sandown's Tingle Creek Chase a Grade 1 contest first run in 1979 star Tingle Creek won 23 of his 52 races in Britain.
Joseph William Tingle, 35, was jailed for life at Teesside Crown Court in August 2007 after jurors convicted him of murdering Richard Petty.