tirade


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to tirade: sentient

ti·rade

 (tī′rād′, tī-rād′)
n.
A long angry speech, usually of a censorious or denunciatory nature; a diatribe.

[French, from Old French, act of firing, from tirer, to draw out, endure, probably back-formation from martirant, present participle of martirer, to torture (influenced by mar, to one's misfortune, tiranz, executioner, tyrant), from martir, martyr, from Late Latin martyr; see martyr.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tirade

(taɪˈreɪd)
n
1. a long angry speech or denunciation
2. (Poetry) prosody rare a speech or passage dealing with a single theme
[C19: from French, literally: a pulling, from Italian tirata, from tirare to pull, of uncertain origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ti•rade

(ˈtaɪ reɪd, taɪˈreɪd)

n.
1. a prolonged outburst of bitter denunciation.
2. a long, vehement speech.
3. a passage dealing with a single theme, as in poetry: the stately tirades of Corneille.
[1795–1805; < French: literally, a stretch, (continuous) pulling < Italian tirata, n. use of feminine of tirato, past participle of tirare to draw, pull < Vulgar Latin *tīrāre, of obscure orig.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Tirade

 an outburst of speech, 1801.
Examples: tirade of infamous falsehoods, 1818; of bombastic nonsense, 1858; of words, 1801.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tirade - a speech of violent denunciationtirade - a speech of violent denunciation  
denouncement, denunciation - a public act of denouncing
declamation - vehement oratory
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

tirade

noun outburst, diatribe, harangue, abuse, lecture, denunciation, invective, fulmination, philippic She launched into a tirade against the authorities.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

tirade

noun
A long, violent, or blustering speech, usually of censure or denunciation:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

tirade

[taɪˈreɪd] Ndiatriba f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tirade

[taɪˈreɪd] ndiatribe f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tirade

nTirade f, → Schimpfkanonade f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tirade

[taɪˈreɪd] nfilippica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
When I began calling myself a scoundrel and a blackguard and my tears flowed (the tirade was accompanied throughout by tears) her whole face worked convulsively.
Milady had listened to all this menacing tirade with a smile of disdain on her lips, but rage in her heart.
But while he was meditating a reply Athelny, more interested in hearing himself speak than in discussion, broke into a tirade upon Roman Catholicism.
Besides, you good-for-nothing rascal, it is strictly forbidden to catch birds in the royal gardens of Fredericksburg; but your blue uniform betrays where you come from." This fine tirade sounded, however, to the ungodly sailor-boy like a mere "Pippi-pi." He gave the noisy bird a knock on his beak, and walked on.
The hunters piled pell-mell out of the steerage, but as Leach's tirade continued I saw that there was no levity in their faces.
Bumble in the outset of a tirade on the subject of poor Oliver's vices.
So I went on to finish my tirade. "She struck me at first sight as the most inconsiderate wrong-headed girl that I ever .
All this heated tirade, this outflow of passionate words and ecstatic ideas which seemed to hustle and tumble over each other as they fell from his lips, bore evidence of some unusually disturbed mental condition in the young fellow who had "boiled over" in such a remarkable manner, without any apparent reason.
Seal rose at the same time, but remained hovering over the table, delivering herself of a tirade against party government.
Dalloway had to listen to the tirade of a fanatical man.
"For a lawyer, you are the hardest man to keep to a point I ever saw," Ernest began his answer to the tirade. "My youth has nothing to do with what I have enunciated.
Ralph, who was no common observer, was surprised to see that as this tirade proceeded, the manner of Lord Frederick Verisopht, who at the commencement had been twirling his whiskers with a most dandified and listless air, underwent a complete alteration.