titchy

titchy

(ˈtɪtʃɪ) or

tichy

adj, titchier, titchiest, tichier or tichiest
informal Brit very small; tiny
[C20: from tich or titch a small person, from Little Tich, the stage name of Harry Relph (1867–1928), English actor noted for his small stature]
Translations
bas-de-plafond

titchy

[ˈtɪtʃɪ] ADJpequeñito, chiquitito

titchy

[ˈtɪtʃɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (Brit) (fam) → minuscolo/a
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References in periodicals archive ?
On a good run we only have to clear up things from the north zone of her titchy body.
Artistic Becca, meanwhile, lurches from one dead-end job to another, shares a titchy flat, and has given up on love.
But having worked for a couple of titchy tyrants I've never had any doubt.
No, Titchy knows the real reason Labour No, Titchy knows the real reason Labour wish to impose such a brutal levy on the wish to impose such a brutal levy on the rich.
The temporary ice rink also disappointed, being titchy and synthetic.
The lovely strawberry and red cherry fruit perfume continues on to the palate, held aloft by a titchy bit of acidity, but this wine is mainly about the approachable fruit which is warmed up a touch by some time in new oak.
Here are some of the events aimed at encouraging people to discover the wonder of the world they live in: | Event: Titchy Tiny Science | Suitable for?
The caravan was horrible and titchy but it's amazing here.
And so we had the pleasure of watching the judge, and his number two, Joe Gateacre (Gary Mavers) "borrowing" BMX bikes from a couple of scallies and racing through the inner city in search of a gang leader called Biggie (who was titchy and looked about seven).