tjanting


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tjanting

(ˈtʃæntɪŋ)
n
(Textiles) a pen-like tool used in batik for applying melted wax to fabric in order to draw pictures and patterns
References in periodicals archive ?
This poet's deft use of the Fibonacci sequence in Tjanting (1981), in which every paragraph after the first two is the sum of the lines in the two preceding ones, plays with a continuous succession of non-correlative sentences, statements and interrogations, which ultimately turn into his discursive social experience.
Moreover, in his review of Language poetry and Silliman's poem "Tjanting," George Hartley affirms Silliman's argument which considers Language a kind of labor process and that his poetry draws attention "to the materiality of the words as words, not simply as transparent signifiers" (Hartley <http://www.riting.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88/hartley.html>).
Students then taped their designs onto the back of the fabric, centering them in order to create a border that could later be designed free hand with the tjanting tools and hot wax.
It's a process of dyeing cotton, using a special tool called a tjanting (pronounced jaunting) to apply hot wax to block out areas on the cotton.
After drawing my images on the pot with a permanent overhead projector pen (OHP) pen, I draw over these lines with lustre resist using a tjanting, allowing for a great degree of control and I often refer to my technique as batik on clay.
This method is most preferred when producing large volumes of batik because it is simple and quicker than a tjanting tool.
An epigram about Ron Silliman calls his work boring, much as Rodefer had called Tjanting boring years ago, in an essay otherwise full of praise.
(7) In brief passing, let me mention two of Spicer's disciples and their number-based poetry: Lyn Hejinians My Life (originally composed in thirty-seven sections of thirty-seven sentences) and Ron Silliman's Fibonacci-derived Tjanting.
The site includes lively comments by readers who often disagree with the blogger's views, and also pages for Silliman's own poetry, including Tjanting, a dazzling long poem structured according to the Fibonacci number system.
As Marjorie Perloff remarks about works by Silliman (Tjanting), Lyn Hejinian (My Lift), and Rosmarie Waldrop (The Reproduction of Profiles), "In these prose compositions, a given sentence, far from following its predecessor or preparing the way for the sentence that follows, remains relatively autonomous, continuity being provided by word and sound repetition as well as by semantic transfer, in what the Russian Formalists called the 'orientation toward the neighboring word.'" If poems resemble paintings, the prose poem could as easily correspon d to a Mondrian abstraction as to a Flemish street scene.
The designs are drawn onto the fabric with hot, liquid wax with a brush or a tool called a tjanting. A tjanting has a wooden handle and a copper kettle with a small downward spout at its end.
When Hejinian writes on the book jacket of Ron Silliman's experimental long poem Tjanting that "The reader recognizes every word," she unequivocally departs from the Poundian or Joycian mode of semantic difficulty.