toga praetexta


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Related to toga praetexta: toga virilis, Toga picta

toga praetexta

(priːˈtɛkstə)
n
(Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) a toga with a broad purple border worn by certain magistrates and priests and by boys until they assumed the toga virilis
[Latin, literally: bordered toga]
References in periodicals archive ?
Freeborn Romans could only wear the toga praetexta, which was ordinary white with a broad purple stripe along the border.
Both boys and girls of the elite wore a toga with a purple border, the toga praetexta, which was also the dress of magistrates and the early kings of Rome.
The name may well be archaic and refers to the fact that the main characters wore the toga praetexta of the Roman magistrate and general.(6) Conversely, plays on Greek subjects were known as fabulae palliatae.
toga praetexta The toga with a purple border that was worn by children, by those engaged in sacred rites, by magistrates, and by others.
A sample of those in the programme are: Judith Sebesta (Dakota, USA): `Verecundo praetexta decori: the toga praetexta of Roman children and praetextate garments'; Hero Granger-Taylor (London): `The display of status through dress'; Guiseppe Scala (Rome): `Domestic silk and fabrics of Pompeii'; Ulla Mannering (Copenhagen): `Dress and identity: Roman garments from Mons Claudianus'; Mercedes Aguirre (Madrid): `Dress and seduction in ancient Greece'; Joanne Fletcher (Manchester): `The decorated body in ancient Egypt: hairstyles, cosmetics and tattoos'; Glenys Davies (Edinburgh) `What made the toga virilis?'; Emma Stafford (Leeds): `Viewing and obscuring the female breast: glimpses of the ancient bra'; Sue Blundell (London) and Nancy Rabinowitz (New York): `Does my bum look big in this?