toga praetexta


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Related to toga praetexta: toga virilis, Toga picta

toga praetexta

(priːˈtɛkstə)
n
(Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) a toga with a broad purple border worn by certain magistrates and priests and by boys until they assumed the toga virilis
[Latin, literally: bordered toga]
References in periodicals archive ?
Freeborn Romans could only wear the toga praetexta, which was ordinary white with a broad purple stripe along the border.
Both boys and girls of the elite wore a toga with a purple border, the toga praetexta, which was also the dress of magistrates and the early kings of Rome.
In practice young men often did not marry until they were twenty-five, (girls married on average in their mid-to late teens) but it would appear that once they shed their toga praetexta, they sought sexual pleasure in the brothels.
The name may well be archaic and refers to the fact that the main characters wore the toga praetexta of the Roman magistrate and general.
toga praetexta The toga with a purple border that was worn by children, by those engaged in sacred rites, by magistrates, and by others.
A sample of those in the programme are: Judith Sebesta (Dakota, USA): `Verecundo praetexta decori: the toga praetexta of Roman children and praetextate garments'; Hero Granger-Taylor (London): `The display of status through dress'; Guiseppe Scala (Rome): `Domestic silk and fabrics of Pompeii'; Ulla Mannering (Copenhagen): `Dress and identity: Roman garments from Mons Claudianus'; Mercedes Aguirre (Madrid): `Dress and seduction in ancient Greece'; Joanne Fletcher (Manchester): `The decorated body in ancient Egypt: hairstyles, cosmetics and tattoos'; Glenys Davies (Edinburgh) `What made the toga virilis?