tolerable


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tol·er·a·ble

 (tŏl′ər-ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Capable of being tolerated; endurable: found the workload tolerable and so kept the job.
2. Acceptable but not superior; passable: "This encouraged me to think I might possibly in time come to be a tolerable English writer" (Benjamin Franklin). See Synonyms at average.

tol′er·a·bil′i·ty, tol′er·a·ble·ness n.
tol′er·a·bly adv.

tolerable

(ˈtɒlərəbəl)
adj
1. able to be tolerated; endurable
2. permissible
3. informal fairly good
ˈtolerableness, ˌtoleraˈbility n
ˈtolerably adv

tol•er•a•ble

(ˈtɒl ər ə bəl)

adj.
1. capable of being tolerated; endurable.
2. fairly good; not bad.
3. Chiefly Dial. in fair health.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin tolerābilis=tolerā(re) to tolerate + -bilis -ble]
tol′er•a•ble•ness, tol`er•a•bil′i•ty, n.
tol′er•a•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tolerable - capable of being borne or endured; "the climate is at least tolerable"
permissible, allowable - that may be permitted especially as according to rule; "permissible behavior in school"; "a permissible tax deduction"
intolerable, unbearable, unendurable - incapable of being put up with; "an intolerable degree of sentimentality"
2.tolerable - about averagetolerable - about average; acceptable; "more than adequate as a secretary"
satisfactory - giving satisfaction; "satisfactory living conditions"; "his grades were satisfactory"

tolerable

adjective
1. bearable, acceptable, allowable, supportable, endurable, sufferable He described their living conditions as tolerable.
bearable unacceptable, intolerable, unbearable, insufferable, unendurable
2. (Informal) fair, O.K. or okay (informal), middling, average, all right, ordinary, acceptable, reasonable, good enough, adequate, indifferent, not bad (informal), mediocre, so-so (informal), run-of-the-mill, passable, unexceptional, fairly good, fair to middling Is there anywhere tolerable to eat in town?
fair bad, awful, dreadful, rotten

tolerable

adjective
1. Capable of being tolerated:
2. Of moderately good quality but less than excellent:
Informal: OK, tidy.
Translations
جيِّديُمْكِن إحْتِماله
přijatelnýsnesitelný
udholdelig
òokkaleguròolanlegur
znosen
dayanılıroldukça iyitahammül edilebilir

tolerable

[ˈtɒlərəbl] ADJ
1. (= bearable) [pain, heat] → soportable, tolerable
2. (= not too bad) [film, food] → pasable

tolerable

[ˈtɒlərəbəl] adj
(= bearable) → tolérable
(= fairly good) → passable

tolerable

adj (lit) pain, noise level etcerträglich; (fig: = not too bad also) → annehmbar, leidlich, passabel (inf); to keep something at a tolerable leveletw im erträglichen Rahmen or im Rahmen des Erträglichen halten; how are you? — tolerablewie gehts dir? — ganz leidlich or passabel (inf); to be tolerable to somebodyfür jdn annehmbar sein

tolerable

[ˈtɒlərəbl] adj
a. (bearable) → sopportabile, tollerabile
b. (fairly good) → passabile, discreto/a

tolerate

(ˈtoləreit) verb
to bear or endure; to put up with. I couldn't tolerate his rudeness.
ˈtolerable adjective
1. able to be borne or endured. The heat was barely tolerable.
2. quite good. The food was tolerable.
ˈtolerance noun
1. the ability to be fair and understanding to people whose ways, opinions etc are different from one's own. We should always try to show tolerance to other people.
2. the ability to resist the effects of eg a drug. If you take a drug regularly, your body gradually acquires a tolerance of it.
ˈtolerant adjective
showing tolerance. He's very tolerant towards his neighbours.
ˈtolerantly adverb
ˌtoleˈration noun
1. the act of tolerating. His toleration of her behaviour amazed me.
2. tolerance, especially in religious matters. The government passed a law of religious toleration.
References in classic literature ?
I tell you it will be more tolerable for the Fejee that salted down a lean missionary in his cellar against a coming famine; it will be more tolerable for that provident Fejee, I say, in the day of judgment, than for thee, civilized and enlightened gourmand, who nailest geese to the ground and feastest on their bloated livers in thy pate-de-foie-gras.
Sir William Lucas had been formerly in trade in Meryton, where he had made a tolerable fortune, and risen to the honour of knighthood by an address to the king during his mayoralty.
Taking one of the Diggers for a guide, they set off along the river, and to their joy soon found the country free from snow, as had been predicted, so that their horses once more had the benefit of tolerable pasturage.
This place was a tolerable long, steep hill or ridge about forty foot high.
In fact, it is possible for a third person to be very intimate, nay even to live long in the same house, with a married couple, who have any tolerable discretion, and not even guess at the sour sentiments which they bear to each other: for though the whole day may be sometimes too short for hatred, as well as for love; yet the many hours which they naturally spend together, apart from all observers, furnish people of tolerable moderation with such ample opportunity for the enjoyment of either passion, that, if they love, they can support being a few hours in company without toying, or if they hate, without spitting in each other's faces.
My Father's house is situated in Bedfordshire, my Aunt's in Middlesex, and tho' I flatter myself with being a tolerable proficient in Geography, I know not how it happened, but I found myself entering this beautifull Vale which I find is in South Wales, when I had expected to have reached my Aunts.
I want her to play and sing with some portion of taste and a good deal of assurance, as she has my hand and arm and a tolerable voice.
The most tolerable sort of revenge, is for those wrongs which there is no law to remedy; but then let a man take heed, the revenge be such as there is no law to punish; else a man's enemy is still before hand, and it is two for one.
I wish we could contrive it," said she; "but I cannot think of any tolerable pretence for going in;no servant that I want to inquire about of his housekeeperno message from my father.
The most trivial, paltry, insignificant part; the merest commonplace; not a tolerable speech in the whole.
At first the work had been tolerable from its novelty, but now it grew irksome; and when he discovered that he had no aptitude for it, he began to hate it.
It was not because I had a strong sense of the virtue of industry, but because Joe had a strong sense of the virtue of industry, that I worked with tolerable zeal against the grain.