tomato


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to·ma·to

 (tə-mā′tō, -mä′-)
n. pl. to·ma·toes
1. A widely cultivated plant (Solanum lycopersicum syn. Lycopersicon esculentum)in the nightshade family, having edible, fleshy, usually red fruit. The tomato is native to and was first domesticated in northern South America.
2. The fruit of this plant.

[Alteration of Spanish tomate, from Nahuatl tomatl, fleshy globose fruit, tomatillo, tomato.]

to·ma′to·ey (-tō-ē) adj.

tomato

(təˈmɑːtəʊ)
n, pl -toes
1. (Plants) a solanaceous plant, Lycopersicon (or Lycopersicum) esculentum, of South America, widely cultivated for its red fleshy many-seeded edible fruits
2. (Plants) the fruit of this plant, which has slightly acid-tasting flesh and is eaten in salads, as a vegetable, etc
3. slang US and Canadian a girl or woman
[C17 tomate, from Spanish, from Nahuatl tomatl]

to•ma•to

(təˈmeɪ toʊ, -ˈmɑ-)

n., pl. -toes.
1. a large, mildly acid, pulpy berry, red to red-yellow when ripe, eaten raw or cooked as a vegetable.
2. the plant bearing this berry, Lycopersicon esculentum, of the nightshade family.
3. Older Slang. a girl or woman.
[1595–1605; earlier tomate < Sp < Nahuatl tomatl]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tomato - mildly acid red or yellow pulpy fruit eaten as a vegetabletomato - mildly acid red or yellow pulpy fruit eaten as a vegetable
solanaceous vegetable - any of several fruits of plants of the family Solanaceae; especially of the genera Solanum, Capsicum, and Lycopersicon
beefsteak tomato - any of several large tomatoes with thick flesh
cherry tomato - small red to yellow tomatoes
love apple, Lycopersicon esculentum, tomato plant, tomato - native to South America; widely cultivated in many varieties
2.tomato - native to South Americatomato - native to South America; widely cultivated in many varieties
tomato - mildly acid red or yellow pulpy fruit eaten as a vegetable
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
cherry tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum cerasiforme - plant bearing small red to yellow fruit
Translations
حَبَّة البَنْدورهطَمَاطِمنَبتَة البَنْدورة
rajčerajčatový
tomattomatplante
TomateParadeiserTomatenflanze
tomato
tomaatti
rajčica
paradicsom
tomat
tómatjurttómatur
トマト
토마토
pomidoras
tomāts
paradajkovýparadajkyrajčiak
paradižnik
tomat
nyanya
มะเขือเทศ
cà chua

tomato

[təˈmɑːtəʊ] (US) [təˈmeɪtəʊ]
A. N (tomatoes (pl)) (= fruit) → tomate m, jitomate m (Mex); (= plant) → tomatera f
B. CPD tomato juice Njugo m de tomate
tomato ketchup Nsalsa f de tomate, ketchup m
tomato paste N = tomato purée tomato plant Ntomatera f
tomato purée Npuré m de tomate, concentrado m de tomate
tomato sauce Nsalsa f de tomate (Brit) (in bottle, sachet) = tomato ketchup

tomato

[təˈmɑːtəʊ] [tomatoes] (pl) ntomate ftomato juice njus m de tomatetomato paste nconcentré m de tomate, purée f de tomatetomato purée npurée f de tomatestomato sauce nsauce f tomatetomato soup nsoupe f à la tomate

tomato

[, (US)]
n pl <-es> → Tomate f

tomato

in cpdsTomaten-;
tomato juice
nTomatensaft m
tomato ketchup
n(Tomaten)ket(s)chup m or nt
tomato puree
nTomatenmark nt
tomato sauce
nTomatensoße f; (= ketchup)(Tomaten)ket(s)chup m or nt

tomato

[təˈmɑːtəʊ, ɒm təˈmeɪtəʊ]
1. n (tomatoes (pl)) → pomodoro
2. adj (juice, sauce) → di pomodoro

tomato

(təˈmaːtəu) , ((American) -ˈmei-) nounplural toˈmatoes
1. a type of fleshy, juicy fruit, usually red, used in salads, sauces etc. We had a salad of lettuce, tomatoes and cucumbers; (also adjective) tomato sauce.
2. the plant which bears these.

tomato

طَمَاطِم rajče tomat Tomate ντομάτα tomate tomaatti tomate rajčica pomodoro トマト 토마토 tomaat tomat pomidor tomate помидор tomat มะเขือเทศ domates cà chua 番茄

tomato

n. tomate;
___ soupsopa de ___.

tomato

n (pl -toes) tomate m
References in classic literature ?
Then Harris packed the strawberry jam on top of a tomato and squashed it, and they had to pick out the tomato with a teaspoon.
But Pickwick, gentlemen, Pickwick, the ruthless destroyer of this domestic oasis in the desert of Goswell Street-- Pickwick who has choked up the well, and thrown ashes on the sward--Pickwick, who comes before you to-day with his heartless tomato sauce and warming-pans--Pickwick still rears his head with unblushing effrontery, and gazes without a sigh on the ruin he has made.
The poor Cat felt very weak, and he was able to eat only thirty-five mullets with tomato sauce and four portions of tripe with cheese.
Beside him, an unrolled bundle showed itself as consisting of a ragged overcoat and containing an empty and smoke-blackened tomato can, an empty and battered condensed milk can, some dog-meat partly wrapped in brown paper and evidently begged from some butcher-shop, a carrot that had been run over in the street by a wagon-wheel, three greenish- cankered and decayed potatoes, and a sugar-bun with a mouthful bitten from it and rescued from the gutter, as was made patent by the gutter-filth that still encrusted it.
Picking up the tomato can, he arose, went down the short path to the river, and returned with the can filled with not-nice river water.
Game was scanty, and they had to eke out their scanty fare with wild roots and vegetables, such as the Indian potato, the wild onion, and the prairie tomato, and they met with quantities of "red root," from which the hunters make a very palatable beverage.
He was always as red as a tomato, now gay as a lark, now grave as a judge.
She went to the open door and stood in it and looked out among the tomato vines and "jimpson" weeds that constituted the garden.
boots, beer bottles, tomato cans, intoxicated citizens, garbage,
These bare places were grown up with dingy, yellow weeds, hiding innumerable tomato cans; innumerable children played upon them, chasing one another here and there, screaming and fighting.
Miss Bartlett was already seated on a tightly stuffed arm-chair, which had the colour and the contours of a tomato.
These are the tomato family monsters, reaching heights of 8 feet or more by the end of the season, with their spread determined by how you prune and support them.