tomato hornworm


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Related to tomato hornworm: tobacco hornworm

tomato hornworm

n.
The green caterpillar of a North American hawkmoth (Manduca quinquemaculata) that feeds on the leaves of solanaceous plants, especially tomato and tobacco.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tomato hornworm - large green white-striped hawkmoth larva that feeds on tomato and potato plantstomato hornworm - large green white-striped hawkmoth larva that feeds on tomato and potato plants; similar to tobacco hornworm
caterpillar - a wormlike and often brightly colored and hairy or spiny larva of a butterfly or moth
References in periodicals archive ?
Birds eat the berries of poison ivy and the tomato hornworm eats the leaves of the tomato, but we know to avoid any contact with poison ivy and a human should never eat the leaves of tomato plants.
Hemiptera: Pentantomidae), Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Co leoptera: Chrysomelidae), tomato hornworm, Manduca quinquemaculata (Haworth) (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae), and silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aley rodidae) (Habeck et al.
The hawk moth -- which, in its larval or caterpillar form is known as the tomato hornworm -- has a long proboscis that is especially well-suited to harvesting the nectar found at the base of Brugmansia's trumpet flowers.
While some members of the Berytidae family are beneficial and prey on crop pests such as aphids, mites, cotton budworm, and tomato hornworm, others are serious pests of tomato, cotton, and cacao.
Children stand in line for a chance to hold a docile tarantula or get nose-to-nose with a 5-inch tomato hornworm.
Most gardeners recognize and value the efforts of solitary parasite wasps, such as braconid wasps, feeding on tomato hornworm caterpillars.
Some popular hosts include the eggs of the: gypsy moth, codling moth, tomato hornworm, cabbage looper, imported cabbage worm and European corn borer.
The hawk moth - which, in its larval or caterpillar form is known as the tomato hornworm - has a long proboscis that is especially well-suited to harvesting the nectar found at the base of Brugmansia's trumpet flowers.
The most common is the Tomato Hornworm, a big (three-inch long), fat (1/3-inch across) green-colored worm with a single horn curving upward at the top of its head.
The flower does resemble a giant moth, similar to the one that metamorphoses from that enormous green tomato hornworm.
Watch him prepare Fried Green Tomato Hornworm or Sweet and Sour Silkworm and taste the results.
You will discover the magnificent tomato hornworm and the parasitic wasps that lay their eggs on its back.